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How can I link a pdf file on my web site only downloadable, and not display this PDF in the browser?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The behavior of what to do with the content of an HTTP response is ultimately determined by the browser, not by the server. However, you can "suggest" to the browser that the content of the response is meant to be a "file" and suggest a name by which to save that file by using the content-disposition header.

Note that the HTTP protocol doesn't really transfer "files" in the sense in which most people infer. It transfers content with associated headers. So everything you do is done through those headers which accompany the content.

Edit: I just noticed your tags... Are you talking about serving the file for download or about linking to a file served elsewhere? If the latter then I'm pretty sure it's out of your control. Your JavaScript can maybe control the content of the request header, but the response header is entirely up to the server.

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I have this on an html page: <a href="a.pdf"> Download </a> and I want that if the user click on it the pdf will only downloaded. –  michele Jul 6 '11 at 11:08
    
@michele: Then you may be out of luck. (Though if someone can correct me on that I'd love to learn about it.) All you're doing in this case, and indeed all you can do, is direct the browser to make a request for the specified resource. How the server responds is not under your control from the browser. The standard approach here is to include instructions telling the user to right-click and save-as. –  David Jul 6 '11 at 11:11

You can set the headers sent with the response to suggest to the the browser it should save the file:

 Content-disposition: attachment; filename=whatever.pdf

How you achieve this on a practical level depends on your webserver and/or programming environment. However, trying to get this done with JavaScript probably isn't the way forward.

Other options include tricking the browser into thinking the file isn't actually a PDF by setting the content-type to application/octet-stream or similar. This is commonly done, whether or not it's a good idea is debatable.

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Thank you. So many people suggesting MIME lies that I feared it was the only way! –  Kristian Glass Jul 29 '12 at 13:15

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