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I am having List object. How I can dispose the list ?

For example,

List<User> usersCollection =new List<User>();

User user1 = new User();
User user2 = new User()

userCollection.Add(user1);
userCollection.Add(user2);

If I set userCollection = null; what will happen?

foreach(User user in userCollection)
{
    user = null;
}

Which one is best?

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4  
Your code doesn't contain any dispose operations. –  CodesInChaos Jul 6 '11 at 11:32
1  
Dispose is for releasing unmanaged resources. If a list does not have any references to it, it will be released by the garbabe collector when appropriate. –  Paolo Moretti Jul 6 '11 at 11:34
1  
@Paolo and prompt cleanup (of some implementation-specific kind) of some managed resources; but yes, unmanaged is more common –  Marc Gravell Jul 6 '11 at 11:35

10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Best idea is to leave it to the garbage collector. Your foreach will do nothing since only the reference will be set to null not the element in the list. Setting the list to null could in fact cause garbage collection to occur later than it could have (see this post C#: should object variables be assigned to null?).

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You linked the whole thread. Could you be more specific as to why garbage collection could occur later in this case? Or maybe even quote the relevant paragraph. –  Virtlink Mar 18 at 17:03
    
@Virtlink - the article states "you could actually wind up extending the time the object stays in memory because the CLR will believe that the object can't be collected until the end of the method because it sees a code reference to the object way down there. " –  RadioSpace Jun 18 at 23:37

Firstly, you cannot "dispose" a list since it isn't IDisposable, and you can't force it to be collected since that isn't how C# works. Typically you would do nothing here. So when might we need to do anything?

  • If it is a method variable, and your method is going to exit in a moment, don't do anything: let the GC worry about it at some point after the method has existed.
  • If it is a field (instance variable), and the object is going to go out of scope in a moment, don't do anything: let the GC worry about it at some point after the instance is unreachable.

The only time you need to anything is if it is a field (or captured variable / iterator block variable / etc) and the instance (/delegate/iterator) is going to live a long while longer - then perhaps set the list field to null. Note, however, that if any other code still has a reference to the list then everything will still be reachable.

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2  
I don't agree that you shouldn't do anything if you don't need the objects in the list anymore. If the objects implement the System.IDisposable interface then the designer of the object thought that the object holds scarce resources. If you don't need it and just assign null to the object, then these scarce resources are not freed until the garbage collector finalizes the object. In the mean time you can't use this resource for something else. –  HaraldDutch Nov 14 '13 at 13:59
    
@HaraldDutch there's a difference between "disposing the list" and "disposing the items in the list". The list normally has no right to assume that it is the sole owner of those objects. –  Marc Gravell Nov 14 '13 at 14:46

I don't agree that you shouldn't do anything if you don't need the objects in the list anymore. If the objects implement the System.IDispoable interface then the designer of the object thought that the object holds scarce resources. If you don't need it and just assign null to the object, then these scarce resources are not freed until the garbage collector finalizes the object. In the mean time you can't use this resource for something else.

Example: Consider you create a bitmap form a file, and decide you don't need neither the bitmap, nor the file anymore. Code would look like follows:

using System.Drawing;
Bitmap bmp = new Bitmap(fileName);
// do something with bmp until not needed anymore
bmp = null;
DeleteFile(fileName); // ERROR, filename is still accessed by bmp.

The good method would be:

bmp.Dispose();
bmp = null;
DeleteFile(fileName);

The same accounts for objects in a list, or any collection. All objects in the collection that are IDisposable should be disposed. Code would look like:

private void EmptyCollection (ICollection collection)
{   // throws all elements in the list, if needed disposes them
    foreach (object o in collection)
    {
        System.IDisposable disposableObject = o as System.IDisposable;
        o = null;
        if (disposableObject != null)
        {
            disposableObject.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

All lists / dictionaries / read only lists / etc can use this method, because they all implement ICollection interface, event if not all elements in the collection implement System.IDisposable.

I used ICollection and not IEnumerable, because IMHO not everything that is Enumerable should be discarded together, while from a collection it might be accepted that the collection contains similar things, that all need to be discarded together.

By the way: I agree there will be some collection functions or linq functions that are faster or make the code smaller, but using this example everyone understands what I mean.

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Another idea for this post... If you were wanting to ensure that all members of a collection are properly disposed, you could use the following extension method:

public static void DisposeAll(this IEnumerable set) {
    foreach (Object obj in set) {
        IDisposable disp = obj as IDisposable;
        if (disp != null) { disp.Dispose(); }
    }
}

This looks through the collection for any member that implements IDisposableand disposing of it. From your executing code, you could clean up the list like this:

usersCollection.DisposeAll();
usersCollection.Clear();

This will ensure that all members get the chance to release resources and the resulting list is empty.

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Why do you want to dispose the list? The GC will do it for you if there is no references to it anymore.

Garbage Collection: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0xy59wtx.aspx

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You are right, but if your list contains IDisposable objects, then those objects are not Disposed() before the garbage collector finalizes them. If a designer of an object declares the object IDisposable he expresses that it holds some scarce resources that should be frees as soon as possible. Consider a bitmap that is created from file. Even if you assign null to the bitmap, you can't destroy the file before the garbage collector has finalized the bitmap. So you never know when you will be able to delete the file. –  HaraldDutch Feb 25 at 10:36

As everyone has mentioned leave to GC, its the best option and don't force the GC. Setting the variable to null will mark the variable for the GC.

if your after more info: Best Practice for Forcing Garbage Collection in C#

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According to the .NET team, setting a variable to null can actually result in it living longer than is necessary. The runtime is very intelligent, and doesn't need you to set a variable to null for it to determine if it can cleanup that memory. The current implementation of the GC actually looks for references to the variable - once there is no further code which touches that variable, the GC will reclaim that memory when there is memory pressue or spare cycles. Setting it to null at the end of a method can prolong its life, because you're creating an additional usage of the variable. –  RyanR Jul 6 '11 at 22:44
    
If you don't dispose the object, it will eventually be disposed by the garbage collector. This will free up scarce resources. The problem is that you don't know when this happens, and thus don't know when the resource is free. Example bitmap that is loaded from file. If you don't dispose the bitmap you don't know when you can delete the file. Just assigning null to it doesn't release the lock on the file. If you call dispose, you are sure that the file can be deleted immediately –  HaraldDutch Dec 5 '13 at 22:47

You haven't provided enough context. Scope is critical here.

I think the GC should be smart enough to deal with the memory allocated for users and the collection without having to set anything to null.

If the collection removes users that aren't necessary from the collection, and no other objects refer to them, they'll be GC'd without you having to provide any hints.

The GC will not clean up an object as long as there's a live reference to it. Eliminate all the references and it can do its job.

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Best way is

userCollection= null;

Than GC will take care of rest.

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-1 yyyyyyyy????????? is anything missing –  Pranay Rana Jul 6 '11 at 11:35
1  
I didn't vote, but certainly can explain. When is this "Bast" or even needed? Why would you clear a list before throwing away the reference? And why set the reference to null when it is getting out of scope? –  Kobi Jul 6 '11 at 11:36
    
Sure. Don't need to loop yourself. –  Zhen Jul 6 '11 at 11:36
    
@Kobi and @Zhen - thanks its removed now –  Pranay Rana Jul 6 '11 at 11:40
    
If you don't dispose a disposable object, its resources are not disposed until the garbage collector finalise the object. If you create a bitmap from a file, and assign null to the bitmap, you can't delete the file because it is still used by the bitmap until it is disposed. Via the finalising of the GC. Therefore you should always Dispose all disposable objects, i stead of just assigning null –  HaraldDutch Dec 5 '13 at 22:42

One other idea is to use brackets that include the scope of your variable that you wish to keep.

for example.

void Function()
{
    ... some code here ....

    {   // inside this bracket the usersCollection is alive
        // at the end of the bracet the garbage collector can take care of it

        List<User> usersCollection =new List<User>();

        User user1 = new User();
        User user2 = new User()

        userCollection.Add(user1);
        userCollection.Add(user2);

        foreach(User user in userCollection)
        {

        }
    }

    ... other code here ....
}
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I've come across scenarios where, when large amounts of data are being processed, the GC doesn't clean-up until after the collection has gone out of scope (technically the GC does its collection when it sees fit and this may not be when then collection goes out of scope).

In these (rare) scenarios, I've used the following class:

public class DisposableList<T> : List<T>, IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
    }
}

You can then use it just like a normal List, e.g.

var myList = new DisposableList<MyObject>();

Then call the Dispose method when you're finished:

myList.Dispose();

Or, alternatively, declare it in a using statement:

using (var myList = new DisposableList<MyObject>())
{
    ...
}

This then causes the GC to do its collection immediately once the DisposableList is out of scope or disposed.

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The only problem with this is you haven't overridden the indexer so it is possible to store objects and not have them disposed when the List is disposed. –  Tony Edgecombe Jun 18 at 13:00

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