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May be a simple question to solve... On button click I call a function on the include file and parse a function name (b). Why b is not a function ? I have the following files (only a sample of the issue):

comum.js

function f(b){
    var a = eval(b +'();');
}

function a(v){
    $.ajax({url:'update.aspx',
            data: 'q=5',
            success: function(){
                f(v);
            }   
    });
}

default.html

<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="comum.js"></script>
<script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript">
    $(function(){
        $("#me").click(function(){
            a('b');
        });
    });

    function b(){
        $("#me").attr("disabled","disabled");
    }
</script>
</head>
<body>
<input type="button" id="me" value="click me" />
</body>
</html>
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2  
eval is not a good idea. –  Daniel A. White Jul 6 '11 at 12:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Don't use eval.

Change this:

a('b');

To this instead:

a(b);

And then also:

success: function(){
    v();
} 
share|improve this answer
    
This one seams to work and if I need to pass two functions names like a([b,c]) also tried and it worked. Super –  CarlosHenckes Jul 6 '11 at 13:26
    
Cheers, glad it's working. Feel free to accept the answer if that's what you ended up using. :) –  Shadow Wizard Jul 6 '11 at 14:02

While the others are right that it is better to not use eval in this situation, you did ask a specific question that hasn't been answered.

"Why b is not a function?"

The reason is that you gave the parameter to the f() function the same name as the global b() function. So when b is eval'd, the b parameter that is "shadowing" the b function is referenced.

function f(b){ // <-- Parameter with same name as function.
    var a = eval(b +'();'); // <-- So the eval is a reference right back to the
}                           //       'b' parameter (a string) instead of the
                            //       'b' function.

  // global function b
function b(){
    $("#me").attr("disabled","disabled");
}

So as you can see, the eval() is executed from the local variable scope, and the first b that is found in the scope chain is the same b that you passed to eval.


All you need to do is change the name of the parameter to something other than b.

  // ---------v------ different name so we don't shadow the global "b()" function
function f( func ){
    var a = eval( func +'();' );
}

So here I changed the parameter to func. Now when the string referenced by func is eval'd, it will reference the global b() function because the parameter is no longer in the way.


FYI, another approach would be to access the function directly as a property of window, because global variables are automatically added as properties.

function f( b ){
    var a = window[ b ]();
}

Now you're asking for the b function directly from the window object, instead of evaluating the argument you received as a member of the variable scope chain.

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1  
+1 for answering the question. The value of the local variable b is the string "b", so eval resolves it to the local b, not the global b (ECMA-262 section 10.2.2 applies). Would rather see a reference to global[b] than window[b] though. –  RobG Jul 6 '11 at 13:36

I'm not exactly sure what you're trying to do, but when you call a with 'b' as a parameter, you are passing the character 'b', rather than a reference to the function b.

To pass a reference to the function b to a, change a('b'); to a(b);.

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he wants to call b via the eval(); with eval(b+'();'); for some reason –  Andy Jul 6 '11 at 12:27
    
Yes... I missed that, but in that case, see Shadow Wizard's answer. –  James Allardice Jul 6 '11 at 12:30
    
Actually I pass two or three functions to be called as variable a(['a','b']) and want to keep functions I use in all application apart from the ones the just manipulate page DOM. In this case function b –  CarlosHenckes Jul 6 '11 at 13:16
    
@user831513: I added an answer that explains why the code in your question doesn't work. –  user113716 Jul 6 '11 at 13:23
    
@James: Oddly enough, this answer is actually sort of correct, but for a different reason. When the string 'b' is eval'd, it is done inside the f() function, which has a parameter named b, which as it turns out refers back to the original 'b' string that was passed. So the result is that with or without the eval, OP is calling 'b'(), and a string is not a function. –  user113716 Jul 6 '11 at 13:28

The program ends up with calling eval('b()') (in f()), but at this point, the function b() cannot be found, since it's defined locally in the lambda function (within $()).

I guess that you have to define b() as global function in order for eval to work the way you want.

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The b function is already global. –  user113716 Jul 6 '11 at 13:20

Why don't you just pass an anonymous function instead of passing the function's name (to parse it using eval)?

It would became like this, and it's better.

function f(b){
    var a = b();
}

function a(v){
    $.ajax({url:'update.aspx',
        data: 'q=5',
        success: function(){
            f(function() {
                ....
            });
        }   
    });
}
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