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Will I have a performance problem if there are 500 elements with this class?

$('.class').hover(function handleIn() { /*code*/ },function handleOut() { /*code*/ });
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Have you tried it? Did it give you any problems? –  hughes Jul 6 '11 at 12:41
1  
You should paste /*code*/, performance here is not clear. –  webarto Jul 6 '11 at 12:43
    
Probably not, comments don't take long to execute. ;-) –  DoctorMick Jul 6 '11 at 12:45
    
Given the complete lack of detail (hardware/software/environment) in the question.... –  KevinDTimm Jul 6 '11 at 12:46

2 Answers 2

You should declare the functions once outside the hover event. So they are created only once and not 500 times:

 function handleIn(){}
 function handleOut(){} 

$('.class').hover(handleIn,handleOut);
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that makes no difference at all. Now there are 1000 anonymous functions which call another function and beyond that, calling it like this will still create 500/1000 unique event handlers. –  jAndy Jul 6 '11 at 12:48

If there are a lot of nodes with the classname class (you mentioned 500) jquery will bind 500 distinct event handler methods for each node. That of course is slower in comparison to only one event handler which handles all nodes.

That is the principle of event delegation and event bubbling. If there is a parent node which all of these .class nodes share, you can delegate any event to that parent node. Of course all elements share the document.body, so for demonstration it is:

$(document.body).delegate('.class', 'mouseenter', function(e) {
    // code when entering
}).delegate('.class', 'mouseleave', function(e) {
   // code when leaving
});

As mentioned, document.body can/should get replaced with a shared parent node which is closer to the nodes. You can also distinct between the hovered nodes in those delegated event handlers by checking the event object or this, both reference the current node if invocation.

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