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So the puzzle is to write a hello world program in your language of choice, where the program's source file as a string has to be a palindrome.

To be clear, the output has to be exactly "Hello, World".


Edit:

Well, with comments it seems trivial (not that I thought of it myself of course [sigh].. hat tip to cobbal).

So new rule: no comments.


Edit:

I feel kind of bad editing someone else's question to say this, but it will eliminate a lot of non-palindromes that keep popping up, and I'm tired of seeing the same simple mistake over and over.

The following is NOT a palindrome:

()()

The following IS a palindrome:

())(

Brackets, parenthesis, and anything else that must match are a major barrier to palindrome-ing, yes, but that doesn't mean you can ignore them and post non-palindrome answers.


Languages represented thus far:

C, C++, Bash, elisp, C#, Perl, sh, Windows shell, Java, Common Lisp, Awk, Ruby, Brainfuck, Funge, Python, Machine Language, HQ9+, Assembly, TCL, J, php, Haskell, io, TeX, APL, Javascript, mIRC Script, Basic, Orc, Fortran, Unlambda, Pseudo-code, Befunge, CFML, Lua, INTERCAL, VBScript, HTML, sed, PostScript, GolfScript, REBOL, SQL

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Sep 20 '12 at 11:40

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
I am confused a little. How can the output be "Hello, World" when that is not a palindrome? –  Ascalonian Mar 18 '09 at 19:30
3  
Question closed as "not a real question"? Excuse me? –  Assaf Lavie Mar 19 '09 at 5:52
4  
I wonder if it is possible to do it without throwaway code. –  Angel Mar 19 '09 at 16:27
10  
Next up on Iron Programmer: A palindrome quine. –  Jeff M Mar 24 '09 at 20:49

69 Answers 69

Lua

x=print"Hello, world"=="dlrow ,olleH"tnirp=x
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PostScript, no comments, 41 chars:

(Hello, World)= quit tiuq =)dlroW ,olleH(

The interpreter stops parsing after quit ... the rest of it is syntactically ill-formed. Here's a version that runs until the end (135 characters):

[/Hello,!World/ pop 12 string/ pop cvs/ pop
dup/ pop 6 32 put/ pop = pop /tup 23 6 pop /pud
pop /svc pop /gnirts 21 pop /dlroW!,olleH/[

The fact that strings are delimited by nonidentical characters (parens) makes this a bit harder. Ironically, one can get around this by using pop in the right places; pop itself is quite coincidentally (and usefully so) a palindrome. ☆^_^☆

pop is quite a lifesaver, actually. I'm not sure how this would be possible if the operator's name weren't a palindrome. :o

Here's a slightly longer version without pop (180 chars):

[/dlroW!,olleH/x/tup/x/pud/x/svc/x/gnirts/Hello,!World
12 string cvs dup 6 32 put =/nigeb>>begin/= tup 23 6 pud svc gnirts 21
dlroW!,olleH/string/x/cvs/x/dup/x/put/x/Hello,!World/[
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Write in "in your language of choice" leaves a pretty big hole. My language of choice for this problem is a home-brew language consisting of one command. So here is the code calling that one command:

HelloolleH

Of course what that command does is print Hello World.

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7  
And the compiler must also be a palindrome! –  Chris Lutz Mar 18 '09 at 20:28
8  
please post your compiler gzipped - the zipped file of course being a palindrome! –  petr k. Mar 18 '09 at 21:04

here's my language:
a is equivelant to white space
b prints "Hello, world"

so here's the program:

aaaaaaa
aaaaaaa
aaaaaaa
aaabaaa
aaaaaaa
aaaaaaa
aaaaaaa
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1  
Or you have to provide the interpreter/compiler too :) –  ephemient Mar 25 '09 at 3:19
3  
Every language was made up at some point in history. –  Stewart Aug 28 '09 at 10:49

Io:

forward   :=  method
"Hello, world" print
tnirp "dlrow, olleH"
dohtem  =:   drawrof
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mIRC Script:

//echo Hello, World | alias dlrow noop poon world saila | dlroW ,olleH ohce//
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Javascript:

(alert)('Hello, World') && ('dlroW ,olleH')(trela)
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Orc: "hello world" << "dlrow olleh"

The "<<" runs both the LHS and RHS in parallel, but only returns the value of the LHS, which the interpreter prints. Follow the Orc link to learn more about Orc (there is a "Try Orc" link where you can run this program yourself).

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1  
but the "<<" make it not a palindrome, no? –  Assaf Lavie May 4 '10 at 19:54

Using comments:

/**/print"Hello, World!";/*/"!dlroW ,olleH"tnirp/**/
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Fortran:

      !DNE      
      PROGRAM PAL!      
      print *,'Hello World!' !      
      ! '!dlroW olleH',* tnirp      
      !LAP MARGORP      
      END!      

or the slightly shorter:

      !DNE
      print *,"Hello, World"!
      !"dlroW ,olleH",* tnirp
      END!
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Plain bash.

echo "Hello World" || "dlroW olleH" oche
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Help. I got this far in C++ (using macros). So I'm posting this as a wiki and welcoming help.

#define x // fidne# 

#include <iostream>
int main() { std::cout << "Hello, World\n"; }
#ifdef N
N fedfi#
} ;"n\dlroW ,olleH" << touc::dts { )(niam tni
>maertsoi< edulcni#

#endif // x
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<?php ">?tixe;";echo 1?"\x48ello, World":"dlroW ,olle84x\"?1 ohce;";exit?>" php?<
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Awk:

BEGIN { print "Hello, World"; exit } { tixe ;"dlroW ,olleH" tnirp } NIGEB

/ \/ }{ / {} BEGIN { print "Hello, world"; exit } /\
\/ } tixe ;"dlrow ,olleH" tnirp { NIGEB }{ / {} /\ /

Old one did not work because of the braces. The new one uses regex literals to embed the reversed code.

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Golfscript - 29 bytes

"dlrow ,olleH";"Hello, World"

';' means pop and discard

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In python 2 lines:

tnirp = 'Hello, World' # print tnirp
print tnirp # 'dlroW ,olleH' = print

can be wrote in 3 lines........

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Python is really tough. Here's the best I can do.

"hello world"
tnirp, fi = True, __doc__#
if tnirp:print fi
#__cod__ ,eurT = if ,print
"dlrow olleh"
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Ruby:

;puts 'Hello! World'.tr'!,;q%,',%q;,!'rt.'dlroW !olleH' stup;

I was really hoping to find a way to make good use of the second half (string) rather than having it sit there just like if I had added a comment... But so far I've only got it fixing the exclamation into a comma...

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Common Lisp:

(or' "Hello, World" "dlroW ,olleH" 'ro)

Both shortest and simplest one? SBCL + Slime:

"dlroW ,olleH""Hello, World"
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1  
MHO: As a valid Lisp program, it has to start and to end with a paren, and in between there are no parens. No rule on earth is absolute. You have to know when (intelligently) to add an exception to a rule. –  joke Mar 25 '09 at 10:58

Unlambda:

`?d`?c`?d`?c`?d`?c`?d``v````````````.H.e.l.l.o.,. .W.o.r.l.di`d
```````````````
d`id.l.r.o.W. .,.o.l.l.e.H.````````````v``d?`c?`d?`c?`d?`c?`d?`
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Here it is in CFML, without using comments:

<cfsetting enablecfoutputonly="true"/>
<cfoutput>Hello, World</cfoutput>
>tuptuofc/<dlroW ,olleH>tuptuofc<
>/"eurt"=ylnotuptuofcelbane gnittesfc<


Or, an extended version that would still work inserted into almost any page, even if global debugging is on:

>/trobafc<<cfcontent reset />
<cfsetting enablecfoutputonly="true" showdebugoutput="false" />
<cfoutput>Hello, World</cfoutput>
>tuptuofc/<dlroW ,olleH>tuptuofc<
>/ "esalf"=tptuogubedwohs "eurt"=ylnotuptuofcelbane gnittesfc<
>/ teser tnetnocfc<<cfabort/>
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shell + Perl

perl -e 'print "Hello, World\n"' '"n\dlroW ,olleH" tnirp' e- lrep
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vbscript:

msgbox+"Hello, World"+y,00,y+"dlroW ,olleH"+xobgsm
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sed, no comments, 51 characters:

;;s/.*\|;s/Hello, World/;q;/dlroW ,olleH/s;|\*./s;;

Give it anything as input: echo SOMETHING | sed -f thisfile.sed

The autocolorcoding looks pretty nice on this one. ☆^_^☆

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Representing REBOL:

REBOL [] print "Hello world!" halt tlah "!dlrow olleH" tnirp [] LOBER
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J

'Hello World!'['!dlroW olleH'

Easy - [ returns the left argument.

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1  
@Assaf: You're right - didn't see that. Edited and now it's even shorter! –  David May 4 '10 at 21:40

It is not strictly a palindrome, but with omiting whitespaces it is :-)

Whitespace code:

H     
e            
l                 
l                     
o                    
,                           
.                       
W            
o            
r                 
l                           
d                     
. 
.                   
.              
.
.   
.   
d   
l 
r       
o
W 
. 
,
o   
l
l
e
H

More readable format, S-space, T-tab:

.SSSSS
.SSSTSTS
.SSSTTSSTSS     
.SSSTTSTTSS     
.SSSTTTSSTS             
.SSSTTSTTTT     
.SSSTSTSTTT     
.SSSTSSSSS
.SSSTSSSSS
.SSSTSTTSS              
.SSSTTSTTTT     
.SSSTTSTTSS     
.S
.SSSSTTSSTST    
.SSSTSSTSSS     
.
.SSS
.T
.SSS
.S
.TST    
.
.S
.S
.
.SST
.
.
.
.
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If I write a normal hello world in c++ without comments or newlines and append a '/', then I have the first half of a working palindromatic program...

Ah, the #include causes a small problem


Like this:

#include <iostream>//
int main(void){std::cout<<"Hello, world!"<<std::endl;}/
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Well, easy if you allow comments.

Just (pseudo-code for any language):

program-that-prints-hello-world // dlrow-olleh-strnirp-taht-margorp

Of course, if you disallow comments, then it becomes much harder.

Here's a C# version:

class P { static void Main() { System.Console.WriteLine("Hello world"); } } //
} };)"dlrow olleH"(eniLetirW.elosnoC.metsyS { )(niaM diov citats { P ssalc

Just put everything on the second line after // with a space in front.

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yet another Haskell solution:

main = putStrLn "Hello World!" -- "!dlroW olleH" nLrtStup = niam

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