Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my programmer's experience, I have mixed error handling all the ways possible... I have created my personal style.

However, I'd like to hear what you consider to be the pro and cons of error handling at the beginning vs at the end of the method.

Handling at the beginning:

public String GenerateSomeStringData(String data, int value)
{
    if (data == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("data");

    if (value <= 0)
        throw new ArgumentException("value must be greater than zero");

    int dataValue;
    if (!int.TryParse(data, out dataValue))
        throw new InvalidOperationException("data does not contain an integer");

    return dataValue * 4 + value / 12;
}

Handling at the end: (the same example)

public String GenerateSomeStringData(String data, int value)
{
    if (data != null)
    {
        if (value > 0) 
        {
            int dataValue;
            if (int.TryParse(data, out dataValue))
            {
                return dataValue * 4 + value / 12;
            }
            else 
                throw new InvalidOperationException("data does not contain an integer");
        }
        else 
            throw new ArgumentException("value must be greater than zero");
    }
    else 
        throw new ArgumentNullException("data");
}

What criteria do you use when deciding how to approach this? Readability, maintainability, brevity?

share|improve this question
    
Its all situational dependent. Whatever makes the code easy to read and understand. –  Loki Astari Jul 6 '11 at 17:17
1  
Clean code would probably favor option one. I don't need to scroll through the entire method to see that my input was not valid. –  CtrlDot Jul 6 '11 at 17:20
    
What does this have to do with c++? –  George Johnston Jul 6 '11 at 17:20
    
@George: You are right, the question is actually not language specific. I have removed the irrelevant tag. –  Kornelije Petak Jul 6 '11 at 17:23
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Validity of input should be a precondition for execution of the method - as such I would (and do) always do the error handling first.

This has the following advantages:

  • It is easier to parse for a human: validating preconditions first, then execution logic (which usually results in some post condition)

  • Clear separation of concerns between error handling and execution logic
    within your method: validation logic is not "sprinkled in" within the execution logic

As mentioned in the comments you have to differentiate between invalid input that violates a precondition and triggers an error condition (such as throwing an exception) and valid input that constitutes an edge condition (i.e. requiring some special logic to handle). The later case I would handle separately after asserting the preconditions, at the beginning of the execution logic of your method.

share|improve this answer
    
How do you define the difference between checking for errors to stop the method execution and checking for valid input to continue method execution? When do you use one approach and when another? –  Kornelije Petak Jul 6 '11 at 17:21
    
@kornelijepetak: Invalid input is an error condition. Every method has an implicit or explicit contract with its callers on what input is valid and which is not. I think what you mean is valid input that should be handled by the logic differently because it constitutes some kind of edge condition. In this case I would handle this right after the error conditions, but as part of the "core logic" of the method. –  BrokenGlass Jul 6 '11 at 17:26
    
Check for errors and missing information first. Then check for valid input after checking for errors. –  Brian Graham Jul 6 '11 at 17:28
add comment

As others have mentioned, I would check for input validity before executing any core logic of the method. Not only does this make logical sense but it also reduces the levels of indentation of your code and guarantees you don't have any if {} statements that are so long you can't see the else on one screen

share|improve this answer
add comment

The first method is much better.

It helps you keep all your validations in one place. You could even write a generic function to handle this type of validations.

Definitely more readability. You are done with all your validations in the beginning so you could go about your actual logic.

If your code spans a little bit more, it will be tough to track down the closing parentheses of the if loops.

share|improve this answer
add comment

My opinion is: do error condition check first for clear definition for someone else about what is OK for your method and what is NOT ok.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.