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I am working with keyframe animations in CSS, and I want to be able to specify different timing functions for each property I'm animating. For instance, during a given keyframe, I'd like to animate opacity from 0 to 1 with an ease-in timing function, and top from 0 to 100 with a linear timing function.

This is possible with CSS transitions, by doing something like the below. (Unfortunately I need keyframed animations for other reasons.)

-webkit-transition-property: opacity, top;
-webkit-timing-function: ease-in, linear;

Also, I noticed (at this link) that the specification for the animation-timing-function property accepts a comma delimited list. However, I don't see any way to specify a corresponding list of properties or any documentation on what the purpose of a list of timing functions is. Does anyone know if what I'm trying to do is possible?

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1 Answer 1

I find it easier to just use comma separated shorthands:

img {
   -webkit-animation:
      updown 2s ease-in infinite,
      rotate 1s ease-out infinite;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/desz9/

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Thanks. This is actually the workaround that I've been using in the meantime - using two separate animations so that I can specify the timing function on each. This gets messy when you want to handle the animationend event since now you have to know to wait for N of them before the animation is really over. Since there is a clean and simple way of doing this with CSS transitions, I was hoping there would be for animations as well. –  Scott Mikula Jul 8 '11 at 16:27
    
Ah, I misunderstood your question. I don't think there's a way to achieve what you want, but I'd sure be glad to be proven wrong. –  Duopixel Jul 8 '11 at 17:52

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