Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Take the following code as a sample:

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Obj: TSomeObject;
begin
  Screen.Cursor:= crHourGlass;

  Obj:= TSomeObject.Create;
  try
    // do something
  finally
    Obj.Free;
  end;

  Screen.Cursor:= crDefault;
end;

if there was an error happening in the // do something section, the TSomeObject that was created I assume will not be freed and the Screen.Cursor will still be stuck as an Hour Glass, because the code was broke before getting to those lines?

Now unless I am mistaking, an Exception statement should be in place to deal with any such occurence of an error, something like:

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Obj: TSomeObject;
begin
  try
    Screen.Cursor:= crHourGlass;

    Obj:= TSomeObject.Create;
    try
      // do something
    finally
      Obj.Free;
    end;

    Screen.Cursor:= crDefault;
  except on E: Exception do
  begin
    Obj.Free;
    Screen.Cursor:= crDefault;
    ShowMessage('There was an error: ' + E.Message);
  end;
end;

Now unless I am doing something really stupid, there should be no reason to have the same code twice in the Finally block and after, and in the Exception block.

Basically I sometimes have some procedures that may be similar to the first sample I posted, and if I get an error the cursor is stuck as an Hour Glass. Adding the Exception handlers help, but it seems a dirty way of doing it - its basically ignoring the Finally block, not to mention ugly code with copy-paste from the Finally to Exception parts.

I am still very much learning Delphi so apologies if this appears to be a straight forward question/answer.

How should the code be correctly written to deal with the Statements and correctly freeing objects and capturing errors etc?

share|improve this question
    
Please explain why you added the try/finally block in this code? Andreas may be correct in inferring that it's the understanding of what try/finally means that is behind the question. – David Heffernan Jul 6 '11 at 18:39
    
not sure what you mean, but I added the try..finally to make sure TSomeObject is released from memory once its done what needs to be done – user741875 Jul 8 '11 at 10:06
up vote 24 down vote accepted

You just need two try/finally blocks:

Screen.Cursor:= crHourGlass;
try
  Obj:= TSomeObject.Create;
  try
    // do something
  finally
    Obj.Free;
  end;
finally
  Screen.Cursor:= crDefault;
end;

The guideline to follow is that you should use finally rather than except for protecting resources. As you have observed, if you attempt to do it with except then you are forced to write the finalising code twice.

Once you enter the try/finally block, the code in the finally section is guaranteed to run, no matter what happens between try and finally.

So, in the code above, the outer try/finally ensures that Screen.Cursor is restored in the face of any exceptions. Likewise the inner try/finally ensures that Obj is destroyed in case of any exceptions being raised during its lifetime.


If you want to handle an exception then you need a distinct try/except block. However, in most cases you should not attempt to handle exceptions. Just let it propagate up to the main application exception handler which will show a message to the user.

If you handle the exception to low down the call chain then the calling code will not know that the code it called has failed.

share|improve this answer
9  
+ for "in most cases you should not attempt to handle exceptions." – Cosmin Prund Jul 7 '11 at 5:55

Your original code isn't as bad as you think:

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Obj: TSomeObject;
begin
  Screen.Cursor := crHourGlass;

  Obj := TSomeObject.Create;
  try
    // do something
  finally
    Obj.Free;
  end;

  Screen.Cursor := crDefault;
end;

Obj.Free will be executed no matter what happens when you // do something. Even if an exception occurrs (after try), the finally block will be executed! That is the whole point of the try..finally construct!

But you also want to restore the cursor. The most pedantic way is to use two try..finally constructs:

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Obj: TSomeObject;
begin

  Screen.Cursor := crHourGlass;
  try
    Obj := TSomeObject.Create;
    try
      // do something
    finally
      Obj.Free;
    end;
  finally
    Screen.Cursor := crDefault;
  end;

end;

[However, I would also not mind

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Obj: TSomeObject;
begin

  Obj := TSomeObject.Create;
  Screen.Cursor := crHourGlass;      
  try
    // do something
  finally
    Screen.Cursor := crDefault;      
    Obj.Free;
  end;

end;

too much. The risk of Screen.Cursor := crHourGlass failing is pretty low, but in such a case the object will not be freed (the finally will not run because you aren't inside the try), so the double try..finally is safer.]

share|improve this answer
    
@David that is my problem, when an error occurs the Cursor is stuck as an hour glass – user741875 Jul 6 '11 at 18:31
3  
@Andreas I am going to quote you. "You never know. Its like wearing seatbelts. Most of the time, it is just plain unnecessary, but it is worth it, because there is always a risk of an accident." – David Heffernan Jul 6 '11 at 19:40
    
I am using this all the time to 'return' the cursor back to normal. +1 – Kenny Jul 7 '11 at 12:14
    
No need for the double try..finally, Andreas. Just invert the order in finally - Obj will be always freed, all bad that can happens is that cursor fail to change. – Fabricio Araujo Jul 7 '11 at 20:31
    
@Fabricio: I guess we should also invert the order just before try as well, then. But it is an annoying bug if the cursor sticks to being crHourGlass, isn't it? And writing a nestled try..finally isn't much work... – Andreas Rejbrand Jul 7 '11 at 20:37

As others have explained, you need to protect the cursor change with try finally block. To avoid writing those I use code like this:

unit autoCursor;

interface

uses Controls;

type
  ICursor = interface(IInterface)
  ['{F5B4EB9C-6B74-42A3-B3DC-5068CCCBDA7A}']
  end;

function __SetCursor(const aCursor: TCursor): ICursor;

implementation

uses Forms;

type
  TAutoCursor = class(TInterfacedObject, ICursor)
  private
    FCursor: TCursor;
  public
    constructor Create(const aCursor: TCursor);
    destructor Destroy; override;
  end;

{ TAutoCursor }
constructor TAutoCursor.Create(const aCursor: TCursor);
begin
  inherited Create;
  FCursor := Screen.Cursor;
  Screen.Cursor := aCursor;
end;

destructor TAutoCursor.Destroy;
begin
  Screen.Cursor := FCursor;
  inherited;
end;

function __SetCursor(const aCursor: TCursor): ICursor;
begin
  Result := TAutoCursor.Create(aCursor);
end;

end.

Now you just use it like

uses
   autoCursor;

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Obj: TSomeObject;
begin
  __SetCursor(crHourGlass);

  Obj:= TSomeObject.Create;
  try
    // do something
  finally
    Obj.Free;
  end;
end;

and Delphi's reference counted interface mechanism takes care of restoring the cursor.

share|improve this answer
    
Very clever, perhaps too clever. I wouldn't advocate this, especially not to someone relatively new to try/finally and try/except. And if you must do this, why bother with ICursor. Just get __SetCursor to return IInterface. – David Heffernan Jul 6 '11 at 19:09
    
Why not, there is nothing dangerous there. The compiler just creates an invisible try finally block for you... The ICursor is there to provide addidional functionality (not included in the sample), ie property to read the original cursor to be restored. – ain Jul 6 '11 at 19:18
    
Oh it works perfectly. It's just another level of complexity. – David Heffernan Jul 6 '11 at 19:27
4  
Very clever, but Delphi just adds an invisible try finally behind the scenes to make sure the reference count goes to zero, so you are just adding complexity to safe a few keystrokes whilst forcing the compiler to generate essentially the same code as doing an extra try-finally yourself. I fail to see the benefit here It looks like a code obfustification contest. IMO the explicit try finally is much better because it explains the intend of the code better and code is written for human consumption, not for the machine. – Johan Jul 7 '11 at 8:26
7  
I don't see it as adding complexity; the benefit is that you don't have multiple (visible) nested try finally blocks which make code harder to read. – ain Jul 7 '11 at 8:40

I would do it like this:

var
  savedCursor: TCursor;
  Obj: TSomeObject;
begin
  savedCursor := Screen.Cursor;
  Screen.Cursor := crHourGlass;
  Obj:= TSomeObject.Create;
  try
    try
      // do something
    except
      // record the exception
    end;
  finally
    if Assigned(Obj) then
      Obj.Free;
    Screen.Cursor := savedCursor;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
2  
Where is Obj declared? In the original question it is a local variable. If Obj was assigned before, and this code assigns a new instance to Obj, unexpected things could happen. – mjn Aug 6 '14 at 8:33
    
thank you mjn, didn't realized I miss the Obj declaration. – sacconago Aug 13 '14 at 17:33

I think the most "correct" version would be this:

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Obj: TSomeObject;
begin
  Obj := NIL;
  Screen.Cursor := crHourGlass;
  try
    Obj := TSomeObject.Create;
    // do something
  finally
    Screen.Cursor := crDefault;
    Obj.Free;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
3  
Obj is not freed if Screen.Cursor := crDefault raises an exception. – David Heffernan Jul 7 '11 at 10:14
1  
Agreed. The most correct version is definitely the one with two try..finally. – Andreas Rejbrand Jul 7 '11 at 11:27
1  
"if Screen.Cursor := crDefault raises an exception" - - - Totally agree with you but can it really happen? What are the chances in real world?? – Kenny Jul 7 '11 at 12:18
    
@david: I have to agree. If I switch the order of statements in the finally block, Screen.Cursor would not be changed back if Obj.Free raises an exception. That leaves two try..finally constructs as the only correct solution, as Andreas already said. I usually assume that Screen.Cursor assignments cannot fail, but that might just be wrong. – dummzeuch Jul 9 '11 at 9:17

Having done a lot of code in services/servers that needs to handle exceptions and not kill the app I usually go for something like this:

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
   Obj: TSomeObject;
begin  
     try
        Obj := NIL;
        try
          Screen.Cursor := crHourGlass;
          Obj := TSomeObject.Create;
          // do something
        finally
          Screen.Cursor := crDefault;
          if assigned(Obj) then FreeAndNil(Obj);
        end;
     except
        On E: Exception do ; // Log the exception
     end;
end;

Note the try finally; inside the try except; and the placement of Obj creation.

if the Obj creates other things inside it's constructor, it may work half-way and fail with an exception inside the .create(); but still be a created Obj. So I make sure that the Obj is always destroyed if it's been assigned...

share|improve this answer
4  
Obj will leak if Screen.Cursor := crDefault raises. Also, what's with if assigned(Obj) then FreeAndNil(Obj)? Calls to TObject.Free already include the if assigned(...) test. – David Heffernan Jul 7 '11 at 11:48
    
Also, if TSomeObject.Create raises an exception its destructor will automatically be called (test it!). Obj will not be assigned at all in this case because the exception occurred before the assignment, so there is no need to free it. So, either Obj := TSomeObj.Create or Screen.Cursor could be done outside the try..finally. – dummzeuch Jul 9 '11 at 9:14
    
The 'if assigned(...)' is actually legacy from older days .. and I will change my ways! - Didn't realize an exception in create() will always call destroy .. thanx! – K.Sandell Jul 12 '11 at 13:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.