Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was recently making a program which needed to check the number of digits in a number inputted by the user. As a result I made the following code:

int x;    
cout << "Enter a number: ";
cin >> x;
x /= 10;
while(x > 0)
{
  count++;
  x = x/10;
}

From what I can tell (even with my limited experience) is that it seems crude and rather unelegant.

Does anyone have an idea on how to improve this code (while not using an inbuilt c++ function)?

share|improve this question
    
I am assuming x is an int or else this will never reach 0 –  Neal Jul 6 '11 at 19:08
    
who do you do the divison before the loop? –  Karoly Horvath Jul 6 '11 at 19:08
    
"Crude and unelegant" is what you're stuck with if you can't use inbuilt functions. –  Mark Ransom Jul 6 '11 at 19:17
    
What do you mean, no inbuilt functions? On ARM CPUs for example, the division operator is an inbuilt function. –  Zan Lynx Jul 6 '11 at 19:22
1  
Sorry, gotta clarify. I am assuming there is a method to simply count the number of digits in an integer using some function in the C++ standard library(i may of course be wrong). To learn more about C++ I have decided to try to make most of the code myself, just to get a feel of how stuff works hence the attempt at try to count the number of digits "manually". –  E.O. Jul 6 '11 at 19:27
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In your particular example you could read the number as a string and count the number of characters.

But for the general case, you can do it your way or you can use a base-10 logarithm.

Here is the logarithm example:

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    double n;
    cout << "Enter a number: ";
    cin >> n;

    cout << "Log 10 is " << log10(n) << endl;
    cout << "Digits are " << ceil(log10(fabs(n)+1)) << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for base-10 logarithm (log10 in <cmath> header). –  Grzegorz Szpetkowski Jul 6 '11 at 19:11
3  
log10(10) == 1, so I think you need floor(log10(n)) + 1. –  Oli Charlesworth Jul 6 '11 at 19:17
    
@oli: Yes you are right. I'll fix it. –  Zan Lynx Jul 6 '11 at 19:19
3  
Try x=0, or x=-1, or x=999.999. –  David Hammen Jul 6 '11 at 19:26
1  
@David: Let us define this program's domain as integral numbers from 1 to infinity. Although I did fix it to handle negative numbers. :-) –  Zan Lynx Jul 6 '11 at 19:32
show 3 more comments
int count = (x == 0) ? 1 : (int)(std::log10(std::abs((double)(x)))))) + 1;
share|improve this answer
    
No, this gives the right result except for x = 0, corrected. –  David Hammen Jul 6 '11 at 19:21
    
Of course, my mistake. Comment deleted. –  Mark Ransom Jul 6 '11 at 19:23
add comment

You could read the user input as a string, and then count the characters? (After sanitising and trimming, etc.)

Alternatively, you could get a library to do the hard work for you; convert the value back to a string, and then count the characters:

cin >> x;
stringstream ss;
ss << x;
int len = ss.str().length();
share|improve this answer
add comment

If x is an integer, and by "built in function" you aren't excluding logarithms, then you could do

double doub_x=double(x);
double digits=log(abs(doub_x))/log(10.0);
int digits= int(num_digits);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Given a very pipelined cpu with conditional moves, this example may be quicker:

if (x > 100000000) { x /= 100000000; count += 8; }
if (x > 10000) { x /= 10000; count += 4; }
if (x > 100) { x /= 100; count += 2; }
if (x > 10) { x /= 10; count += 1; }

as it is fully unrolled. A good compiler may also unroll the while loop to a maximum of 10 iterations though.

share|improve this answer
add comment
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
int count=0;
    double x;
    cout << "Enter a number: ";
    cin >> x;
    x /= 10;
    while(x > 1)
    {
      count++;
      x = x/10;
    }
    cout<<count+1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
A comment accompanying the code would be welcome. –  Joce Oct 9 '13 at 14:18
add comment

Bar the suggestions of reading the number as a string, your current method of counting the number of significant decimal digits is fine. You could make it shorter, but this could arguably be less clear (extra set of parenthesis added to keep gcc from issuing warnings):

while((x = x/10))
  count++;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.