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I was looking on how to have a leading zero in ruby, and I found out the solution: use %02d" Now, I'd like to do a loop, and keep this zero ! When I do something like this

i = "%02d" % "1".to_i
until (i == 10)
  puts i
  i += 1
end

I have an error "Cannot convert FixNum to string". So I decide to do this

i = "%02d" % "1".to_i
"01"
until (i == 10)
  puts i
  i = i.to_i
  i += 1
end

So, this time, the loop work, but only the first number have the leading 0. I ran out of idea, so I'd appreciate a little help !

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2  
in ruby the i += 1 is typically avoided, notice none of the answers given include that. .upto, .times, .each, .each_with_index will all be more common in ruby code –  Beanish Jul 6 '11 at 21:52
1  
Don't forget to indent your code in future. –  Andrew Grimm Jul 6 '11 at 23:12
    
@Beanish Okay, I didn't know, thanks :) @Andrew Yeap, sorry for that –  Simon Jul 8 '11 at 9:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I'm not a Ruby developer, but fundamentally I think you need to separate out the idea of the number i, and the text representation with a leading 0. So something like:

for i in (1..10)
  puts "%02d" % i
end

(As you can see from the other answers, there are plenty of ways of coding the loop itself.)

Here i is always a number, but the expression "%02d" % i formats i as a two-digit number, just for display purposes.

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Thank, it's exactly what I need ! I saw the difference between the two things, and understand better the first error ^^ Thank you ! –  Simon Jul 6 '11 at 22:03
    
Yes thanks Jon. You're the man. –  Abram Dec 27 '12 at 3:48

Don't convert to a string for output until you're ready to actually output. You don't increment string values, typically.

0.upto(10) { |i| puts "%02d" % i }
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That work fine but the Jon Skeet's solution fits better for my code. Thank you anyway :) –  Simon Jul 6 '11 at 22:02
    
That's cool, but you probably want to consider whether your code really benefits from a non-Ruby construct (iterating with until). Iterating up to a variable fixnum like you're doing makes more sense with a closer-to-native loop (which happens to be Enumerable in Ruby) that is also more idiomatic (see above). –  coreyward Jul 6 '11 at 22:40
10.times do |x|
  puts "%02d" % x
end
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