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I'm using the backtracking algorithm in tree thanks to a stack (with push and pop). It works but i've got a problem. The path given by the stack is "wrong".

bool Prefix(Node*root, stack *tas, char *search)
{
    if (!isEmpty(root))
    {
        if (strcmp(search,root->data) != 0)
            push(tas, root->data, search, root);

        if (strcmp(search,root->data) == 0)
        {
            return True ;
        }

        Prefix(root->left, tas, search);
        Prefix(root->right, tas, search);
    }
    return False;
}

For example, i've got a tree as :

     Root
    /    \    
   A      B
  / \    / \
 C   D  E   F    

When I want the path of C for example, this function returns R A B (ok for R and A, not B).

I don't know if it comes from this function or the push() function. If you don't see any error in the function, I will paste push() but it's quite long.

Edit: I better understand now, I've added to the function :
if node is a leaf, pop(). If I search F, it returns me R A B F instead of R B F. I don't konw how to avoid to keep A in the stack.

edit2 :

Here is the code : (returns R A B F instead of R B F)

bool Prefix(Node*root, stack *tas, char *search)
{
    if (!isEmpty(root))
    {
        if (strcmp(search,root->data) == 0)
            return True ;

        if (LeafOrNot(root) == True ){  //it's a leaf, pop()
            pop(tas);

        if (Prefix(root->left, tas, search))
            return True;
        if (Prefix(root->right, tas, search))
            return True;
    }
    return False;
}

I don't understand how I can pop traversing child node to obtain the good result, maybe adding a else to if (Prefix(root->left, tas, search)) ? Anyone have an idea ?

thanks !

share|improve this question
    
You're almost there. If you pop from the stack not just at the leaf node but after traversing any child nodes, this will give you the result you want. Just be sure that you don't pop off the stack when the node is found. If you're searching for D, it will be push Root, push A, push C, pop C, push D, found... unwind all the way back up the call chain. If you're searching for F: push Root, push A, push C, pop C, push D, pop D, pop A, push B, push E, pop E, push F, found, unwind... Hope this helps. –  Sophy Pal Jul 7 '11 at 8:31
    
I've tried to had another pop(tas) but it doesn't work. I need to change the code's structure ? thanks –  lilawood Jul 7 '11 at 20:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have to agree with @Mark Elliot but at first glance, his answer may seem confusing. You do need a stop condition so you don't keep exploring other nodes and adding them to the stack. You are returning a bool so you can use that to test if the call finds the node your looking for.

If it was your intention to include the last node in the path to C in the stack, then you should remove the string compare when adding to the stack.

For example, you could do this.

bool Prefix(Node*root, stack *tas, char *search)
{
    if (!isEmpty(root))
    {
        push(tas, root->data, search, root);

        if (strcmp(search,root->data) == 0)
        {
            return True;
        }

        if (Prefix(root->left, tas, search))
            return True;
        if (Prefix(root->right, tas, search))
            return True;
    }
    return False;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The push here is excessive; the only thing that needs to be stored on the stack is the Node*. An efficient way to do this is to allocate Node stack elements from the program stack, and then process the Node stack when the matching Node is found. e.g., typedef struct NodeStack NodeStack; struct NodeStack { Node* node; NodeStack* link; }; ... bool Prefix(Node* node, NodeStack* link, char* search){ if(!isEmpty(node){ NodeStack elem = { node, link }; if(strcmp(search, node->data) == 0){ processStack(&elem); return true;} if(Prefix(node->left, &elem, search)) return true; etc. –  Jim Balter Jul 7 '11 at 6:51
    
Also, the tail recursion could be turned into iteration simply by changing the if(!isEmpty... to a while and replacing the second if(Prefix... with node = node->right; (I replaced root with node, because it's an arbitrary node, not the root; bad names make for bad code). –  Jim Balter Jul 7 '11 at 6:55
    
All good points but as you can see, my code sample is merely a slight modification of the original to point out Mark's answer. –  Sophy Pal Jul 7 '11 at 7:31
1  
Yes, and I upvoted it, but this is an education site. I wasn't criticizing your code, rather the OP's push call, and pointing out additional optimization. Note: the reason that I included these comments here is because yours is the best answer and where the OP is most likely to look and thus is the best place to point out these improvements. –  Jim Balter Jul 7 '11 at 7:47

At least one problem is that you're not checking the return values of your calls to Prefix, so you don't know if the recursive calls "finish" (and that you should stop exploring).

A simple way to see this is just walk through the function calls (given your sample tree):

Prefix("Root")
  found "C"?
    no: Prefix("A")
      found "C"?
        no: Prefix("C")
           found "C"?
              yes: return true
        (without check of Prefix("C")): Prefix("D")
           found "C"?
              no: return false
      Prefix("B")
        found "C"?
          no: Prefix("E")
             found "C"?
               no: return false
          Prefix("F")
             found "C"?
               no: return false
       return false
  return false

This shows the order of the calls and indents correspond roughly to frames on the call stack.

You can see where checking if a call to Prefix returns true will allow you to exit at the appropriate time.

share|improve this answer
    
also, does the poster need to add both branches? –  Mitch Wheat Jul 7 '11 at 0:06
    
and you can at least see what you are getting at each step. Simple printf can help :) –  hari Jul 7 '11 at 0:07
    
@Mitch: How else would the algorithm explore both child nodes? –  Mark Elliot Jul 7 '11 at 0:08
2  
@Mitch: Suppose you want to find the path to D, and you only explore the left branch, you cannot find the path, despite one existing. The OP's function only records nodes the algorithm has visited (not all candidate visits), thus to enumerate paths it must explore all available branches. –  Mark Elliot Jul 7 '11 at 0:12
1  
@Mitch: Sure, Binary Search Trees have that property, straight Binary Trees have no ordering requirements. Given the OP's original function and description, I see no reason to think it's a BST. (also, OP openly states using a backtracking algorithm, which requires...backtracking) –  Mark Elliot Jul 7 '11 at 0:19

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