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I've to remove every second element from a SortedDictionary as fast as possible. The dictionary (SortedDictionary<string, List<string>>) can have up to 20'000 elements. So I came up with this solution:

try
{
    int loop = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        Routes.Remove(Routes.ElementAt(loop).Key);
        loop++;
    }                
}
catch
{
}

Is there an easier / better solution than this? Will the caught exception have an impact on the performance?

Edit: This seems to be a better solution (see comment below):

SortedDictionary<string, List<string>> resizedRoutes = new SortedDictionary<string, List<string>>();
bool b = true;
foreach(KeyValuePair<string, List<string>> route in Routes)
{                                        
    if(b)
    {
        resizedRoutes.Add(route.Key, route.Value);
        b = false;
    }
    else
    {
        b = true;
    }
}
Routes = resizedRoutes;

Please edit/comment if you have a better solution. Thanks.

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I doubt it, because you either need to:

  1. Remove the items, causing the tree to be rebalanced

  2. Add the items to a new tree, causing the new tree to be rebalanced

You can't really avoid it, but it might be more efficient to just iterate through them and put them in a SortedList if you won't be modifying the data very often.

Yes:

Iterate through the items, then add every other item them to a new tree, instead of modifying the current tree. That way you'll avoid the cost of calling ElementAt every time, which is at least logarithmic in an ideal implementation, and linear with LINQ's (which is horrible, because LINQ has no idea about the implementation of your tree).

As for the exception: Yes, it will have a performance hit. But I have no idea how much that is relative to what you're doing, so it may or may not be significant.
But either way, you should not be ignoring exceptions. :)

While you're at it:

Might want to take a look at functional programming. :)

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1  
I was about to post this answer before your update. Building a new tree would be much cheaper than rebalancing an old tree every removal. –  drharris Jul 7 '11 at 1:18
    
@drharris: Yeah, I totally didn't notice that ElementAt is linear, so I completely ignored it and thought it's fine. –  Mehrdad Jul 7 '11 at 1:19
    
@Mehrdad Thanks a lot for your answer :-) I think I will build a new tree. Is my assumption correct, that this solution will use more (50% more) memory than my proposal? –  Mike Jul 7 '11 at 1:36
    
@Mike: Yes, temporarily (more or less). –  Mehrdad Jul 7 '11 at 1:48
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That is a good enough solution. If an exception is caught, then it will stop removing elements from the dictionary. Maybe rearrange it, like so:

int loop = 0;
lock(Routes)
{
    while (true)
    {
        try
        {
            Routes.Remove(Routes.ElementAt(loop).Key);
            loop++;
        }
        catch { break; }
    }
}

This will make sure the dictionary cannot be modified while elements are being removed.

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2  
And Gulp!, catch eats another exception! :( –  Michael Haren Jul 7 '11 at 1:20
    
hmm, interesting, why did you put the try/catch into the while loop? –  Mike Jul 7 '11 at 1:23
1  
So when it tries to remove the element that doesn't exist (at the end), it will break out of the loop. –  Brian Graham Jul 7 '11 at 1:31
    
+1 for the lock(Routes) –  Mike Jul 7 '11 at 1:45
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