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Say I have a string coming in, "2007-02-28", what's the simplest code I could write to turn that into "2007-03-01"? Right now I'm just using strtotime(), then adding 24*60*60, then using date(), but just wondering if there is a cleaner, simpler, or more clever way of doing it.

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4 Answers

up vote 33 down vote accepted

A clean way is to use strtotime()

$date = strtotime("+1 day", strtotime("2007-02-28"));
echo date("Y-m-d", $date);

Will give you the 2007-03-01

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It's cleaner and simpler to add 86400. :)

The high-tech way is to do:

$date = new DateTime($input_date);
$date->modify('+1 day');
echo $date->format('Y-m-d');

but that's really only remotely worthwhile if you're doing, say, a sequence of transformations on the date, rather than just finding tomorrow.

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Stupid CentOS only has PHP 5.1, and DateTime is introduced in 5.2. I guess I finally have to upgrade to an unofficial centos php package then. –  davr Mar 18 '09 at 23:45
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Er, no. Just adding 86400 is false simplicity. –  staticsan Mar 19 '09 at 4:35
    
Could you explain what you mean by that? –  chaos Mar 19 '09 at 4:52
    
It is quite easy to understand what 24*60*60 means at a glance. 86400 less so. –  Tom Haigh Mar 19 '09 at 11:08
    
Ah. I guess I've been doing this too long, then. 86400 is as recognizable to me as 65536. –  chaos Mar 19 '09 at 13:28
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You can do the addition right inside strtotime, e.g.

 $today="2007-02-28";
 $nextday=strftime("%Y-%m-%d", strtotime("$today +1 day"));
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Oh, neat. Didn't know that. It's almost like good old Date::Manip. –  chaos Mar 19 '09 at 0:06
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Another way is to use function mktime(). It is very useful function...

$date = "2007-02-28";
list($y,$m,$d)=explode('-',$date);
$date2 = Date("Y-m-d", mktime(0,0,0,$m,$d+1,$y));

but I think strtotime() is better in that situation...

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nice, I didn't realise that mktime() would increment the month like that when you go over –  Tom Haigh Mar 19 '09 at 11:10
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