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I am trying to understand some C++ syntax:

template<class T>
class Foo 
{
   Foo();

   template<class U>
   Foo(const Foo<U>& other);
};

template<class T>
Foo<T>::Foo() { /*normal init*/ }

template<class T>
template<class U>
Foo<T>::Foo(const Foo<U>& other) { /*odd copy constructed Foo*/ }

So, I wrote code like this, and it happens to compile fine in windows and linux. What I don't understand is why the copy constructor has two templates defined as so. Basically, I had to expirment a bit before I found the correct syntax and I would like to know why that particular syntax is correct, and not something like template<class T, class U>.

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This is not a copy constructor. The compiler will complain if you try to pass class Foo<T> by value. –  Alexandre C. Sep 16 '10 at 17:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It has to have separate template clauses for each template that is involved. Here, two templates are involved, that all deserve their (non-empty) template clauses:

  • The class template Foo
  • The constructor template

Consider this case which fails because of the ambiguity as to where the parameter U belongs to

template<typename T>
struct A {
    template<typename U> void f();
};

template<typename T, typename U>
void A<T>::f() { }

Now, what is up with the parameter U? Sure the compiler could guess it could belong to f, but guesswork is not what the compiler likes :) The existing rule says that depending on the nesting of templates, template clauses appear in the right order. Everything is clear then.

Even if one comes up with a rule how to match the parameters to arguments of the templates involved (so far i don't see a real difficulty in doing that), it would be inconsistent. Because as of now, one template clause lists all parameters that the corresponding template accepts. Much like a function parameter list. If we would put everything into one clause, that clear semantic could be broken - not to mention that when we put the definition into the class again, all of a sudden the template would get its own clause:

// provides arguments for A's parameters, then for f ones 
// when it's called
A<int> a; 
a.f<bool>();

It's much more natural when we have separate template clauses that catch each their own arguments. So, the syntax for the above wrong definition is

template<typename T> 
 template<typename U>
void A<T>::f() { }

Now, also the reader of the code immediately sees that this is a definition of a member template, and not a (potential accidentally declared but unused) second parameter for A.

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The first template ( with parameter T) says that the class is templated with a parameter T.

The second template (with parameter U) says that the member function of the templated class (with parameter T) is templated with parameter U - that is the constructor.

In fact, here you have a template class that will generate as many copy constructor as types used as parameter of the constructor.

In the specific case of copy constructor, you shouldn't do this but instead :

template<class T>
class Foo 
{
   Foo();

   Foo(const Foo<T>& other);
};

template<class T>
Foo<T>::Foo() { /*normal init*/ }

template<class T>
Foo<T>::Foo(const Foo<T>& other) { /*odd copy constructed Foo*/ }

Because in you example it's not copy constructor but constructor that take type U as parameter: a convertion constructor... that is hard to predict.

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There can be legitimate reasons for wanting to have implicit construction of a Foo<T> from a Foo<U>, but you're right that it's not really a copy constructor then. –  Tyler McHenry Mar 18 '09 at 23:50
    
Actually, in my actual code, I have both Foo<T> and Foo<U> type constructors, but the point is well taken. Im glad the compiler can work out this stuff.. –  Voltaire Mar 18 '09 at 23:50
    
Yes it's necessary because as T. McHenry said, in some cases you want this behavior. When you want to manage several types of number types for example, might be a good idea to make your member function templated to have only one definition for all the types, ignoring if it's a class or a basic type. –  Klaim Mar 18 '09 at 23:58
    
imagine shared_ptr<T> which allows constructing from shared_ptr<U> as long as U* converts to T* –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 19 '09 at 0:00
    
I would suggest editing: "...as many copy constructor as types..." and to remove "copy" from this line. As you point out later this is never a copy constructor - and even if he leaves this constructor in, he should also add the version you have. –  Richard Corden Mar 19 '09 at 11:06

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