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problem occurs at return this.permission.contains(permission);

package sef.module15.activity;

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Set;

public class PermissionList implements Permissable {

    private Set<Permission> permission;

    /**
     * Creates a permission object and provides an identifier for it
     * 
     * @param permissionID
     */

    public PermissionList(String permissionID) {

        if (permissionID == null) {
            this.permission = new HashSet<Permission>();
        }

    }

    public Set<Permission> getPermission() {

        return permission;

    }

    public void removePermission(Permission... permission) {
        this.permission.remove(permission);

    }

    public void setPermission(Permission... permission) {
        if (permission == null) {
            setPermission(permission);
        }

    }

    public boolean isPermissable(Permission permission) {
        return this.permission.contains(permission);
    }
}

here's the permissable.java

package sef.module15.activity;

import java.util.Set;

public interface Permissable {

    public void setPermission(Permission... permission);

    public void removePermission(Permission... permission);

    public Set<Permission> getPermission();

    public boolean isPermissable(Permission permission);
}

and heres permission.java

package sef.module15.activity;

public enum Permission {
    READ,
    WRITE,
    CREATE,
    DELETE,
    EXECUTE;

}
share|improve this question
1  
What is the "calling code" i.e., who calls this class and it's methods? – PhD Jul 7 '11 at 3:45
    
setPermission looks somewhat recursive if permission is null also. – Mr Moose Jul 7 '11 at 3:51
    
updated who calls the class and the methods involved – Rebel Jul 7 '11 at 3:52
    
Not enough. WHERE is the concrete class implementing the interface and the actual methods it calls??? The calling flow = stack trace printed when you get an exception! (Your related classes) Update with the actual line of code(s) that calls setPermission or getPermission etc., – PhD Jul 7 '11 at 3:56

The set is null if permissionID is passed to the program ? That is a problem

  if (permissionID == null) {
        this.permission = new HashSet<Permission>();
    }

Give us the stack trace and the calling code. It is difficult to pinpoint the source of the NPE without this

share|improve this answer

If the constructor's permissionID is null, permissionSet is never assigned a value. Thus, if the permissionID is passed, the methods which access permissionSet will all throw a NullPointerException.

share|improve this answer
  1. If permissionID passed in constructor is not-null, then your instance variable permission is never initialised. Hence, pointing to that will give you a NPE.

  2. Your setPermission() implementation is recursive. A recursion that will not end gracefully and will never add anything to your Set.

Possible fixes:

Initialise your Set in constructor like below,

public PermissionList(Permission permission) {
    permissions = new HashSet<Permission>(); // Change your Set name to permissions
    if (permission != null) {
        permissions.add(permission);
    }    
}

Implementation of setPermissions() method,

public void setPermissions(Permission... permissions) {
    for(Permission per : permissions) {
        this.permissions.add(per);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
displays an assertion error says the JUNIT test... – Rebel Jul 7 '11 at 5:03
    
@Rebel: From where, JUnit came into play? – Adeel Ansari Jul 7 '11 at 6:42

thats because you are trying to check a property from a not initialized variable. Try that to control if you permission variable and the argument passed to the function are not null:

public boolean isPermissable(Permission p) {
        boolean exit = false;
        if((permission != null) && (p != null)){
              exit = permission.contains(p);
        }
        return exit;
    }

anyway i recommend you to create an empty constructor for your class, and initialize all the variables

PermissionList(){
    permission = new HashSet();
}

EDIT

I just found a strange thing in your code. Here

public PermissionList(String permissionID) {

        if (permissionID == null) {
            this.permission = new HashSet<Permission>();
        }

    }

You will never initialize your permission property, unless you call the constructor that way: PermissionList myPermission = PermissionList(null), because you dont have an empty constructor like PermissionList myPermission = PermissionList(), and any string that you pass as permissionID will not be null.

Why you use the permissionID argument? Where do you store it?

Thats why you get a NPE wen you call this.permission in your code. You never initilize the permission property.

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