Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public void stop(){
    setRun(false);
    inComingWorkThread.interrupt();
    outGoingWorkThread.interrupt();
}

I was trying to stop those thread using interrupt call. And I got an interrupt exception.

public class OutgoingListWorker implements Runnable{

@Override
public void run() {
     while(mRunning){
          WorkOrder workOrder = getWorkOrder();
          //do something
     }
}

public synchronized WorkOrder getWorkOrder(){
    while(mWorkOrderList.size() == 0){
        try {
            this.wait();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {e.printStackTrace();}
    }
    return mWorkOrderList.poll();
}

public synchronized void addWorkOrder(WorkOrder workOrder){
    this.notify();
    mWorkOrderList.add(workOrder);
}

The problem is getWokrOrder calls wait and if an interrupt happened this time then it won't kill the thread.. How do I kill the blocked thread safely? Thanks in advance..

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think it's because you catch the InterruptedException and continue looping...

Exception Handling

There are two ways you could deal with this:

Catch the InterruptedException outside of the loop and return null.

public synchronized WorkOrder getWorkOrder() {
    WorkOrder workOrder = null;

    try {
        while(mWorkOrderList.size() == 0) {
            this.wait();
        }

        mworkOrder = WorkOrderList.poll();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }


    return workOrder;
}

Using this option, you would need to handle the case where getWorkOrder() returns null in your run() method:

if (workOrder != null) {
    //do something
}

Or secondly, you could just throw InterruptedException and force your run() method to do something about it.

public synchronized WorkOrder getWorkOrder() throws InterruptedException {
    while(mWorkOrderList.size() == 0){
        this.wait();
    }

    return WorkOrderList.poll();
}

Interrupts

As a side note, there is no need to maintain a mRunning variable. That is exactly what interrupts do for you!

Instead of:

while(mRunning) {
    WorkOrder workOrder = getWorkOrder();
    //do something
}

Just write:

while(!Thread.interrupted()) {
    WorkOrder workOrder = getWorkOrder();
    //do something
}

And then you don't even need to call setRun(false); at all! Here is a good tutorial about interrupts: http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/interrupt.html

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could always add mRunning as a condition to the wait() loop in getWorkOrder():

while(mWorkOrderList.size() == 0 && mRunning){
    try {
        this.wait();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {e.printStackTrace();}
}

if (mWorkOrderList.size() > 0) {
    return mWorkOrderList.poll();
}
return null;

Now, when you interrupt the thread, the loop condition won't be true and you'll drop out of the wait() loop. You also need to make sure that there's actually an order to return (shown above), and you'll have to add a null check in the run() loop as well (not shown.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.