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I have seen an example with the switch statement where each case block was surrounded by the curly brackets, like this:

switch (itemType)
{
    case ItemType.TV:
    {
        String message = Messages.GetMessage(itemType);
        Console.WriteLine(message);
        break;
    }
    case ItemType.Computer:
    {
        XPMessage message = XPMessage.Next();
        if(message.Data == "XC12")
            message.IsValid = true;

        break;
    }
    case ItemType.WashingMachine:
    {
        String message = "Washing machines are so cool.";
        Messages.SendMessage(message, itemType);
        break;
    }
    default:
    {
        break;
    }
}

The only benefit I am aware of is limiting the declaration scope (seen in the example).

However, I'd like to know if there are any other good uses for separating some parts of the code in such kind of a code block (and here I mean not neccessarily within the switch statement).

When and how do you use it, and if you don't - why don't you?

Also, is there any downside to using such blocks of code?

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1  
code is written once and read many times, so as to facilitate a better read –  V4Vendetta Jul 7 '11 at 5:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As you said declaration scope is one of them and also readability. Some people think it's much easier to see the braces rather than having to keep going until they see a break statement. It seems to be a personal preference. In this case it's done for scoping purposes because not all the statements use the same data type.

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Also would like to thank OP for the well formatted question, they're harder to come by sometimes :) –  Jesus Ramos Jul 7 '11 at 5:58
    
@Ramos That's completely true. I just wish I am better with English so I could post correctly written text. And as for the formatting - better question can produce better answers. :) –  Kornelije Petak Jul 7 '11 at 6:16
    
Perfectly fine for me keep it up. –  Jesus Ramos Jul 7 '11 at 6:22

It's just a stylistic thing that some people prefer for readability/white space, when not done for scope purposes.

There are no additional benefits that I am aware of.

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