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I am unable to write the negative lookbehind RE in python. theses are some of the sample strings(I have more than 80,000 text messages like this);

patient 100/64  bp is 120/90 *some string*  
100H/64 patient bp 120/90  
location 100c/64 patient bp120/90 *some string*
*some string* 100/64 patient *this string with no 'bp' value*

Here 120/90 means patient's blood pressure. I just want to extract the 'ward#/bed#' (eg: 100/64, 100H/64, 100c/64,100/64) and not the blood pressure. I am unable to write the negative lookbehind assertion as it requires fixed length. Here is my RE:

(?<!bp.*)(\b[0-9]{1,3}[a-zA-Z]?)\/([0-9]{1,3}[a-zA-Z]?\b)

this is not working as i have .* in the negative lookbehind.. please help me on this.

Edit: Each patient record starts in a new line and I have these records in a text file which I get it from Hadoop processing. blood pressure value is not always at the end (or it may not appear in some records) and ward/bed value is not always at the beginning.

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Not sure why you need the lookbehind. If these are separate lines, why not just get everything till the first space? Wouldnt that work for you? –  rajasaur Jul 7 '11 at 7:00
    
I have edited the stings, ward/bed is not always at the begining..sorry for that –  Mahin Jul 7 '11 at 7:02
    
Is the input a series of python strings in a list? one string with each patient record starting a new line? If you give the Python input format, someone could do a bit more for you. –  Paddy3118 Jul 7 '11 at 7:04
    
each patient record starts in a new line and I have these records in a text file which I get it from Hadoop processing. –  Mahin Jul 7 '11 at 7:08

2 Answers 2

If the blood pressure is always after your expression than just turn your idea around and match only if "bp" is following. For the look ahead it is allowed to have quantifiers.

(\b[0-9]{1,3}[a-zA-Z]?)\/([0-9]{1,3}[a-zA-Z]?\b)(?=.*\bbp)

See it here at Regexr

That means

(?=.*\bbp) a positive lookahead that ensures that the string bp following.

If you can not relay on the "bp" then just check if the same pattern is repeating again in the look ahead like this

(\b[0-9]{1,3}[a-zA-Z]?)\/([0-9]{1,3}[a-zA-Z]?\b)(?=.*[0-9]{1,3}[a-zA-Z]?\/[0-9]{1,3}[a-zA-Z]?)

See it here on Regexr

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sorry its not always true, I have edited the question. I use 'bp' to differentiate ward/bed from blood pressure. anyway thanks alot for the quick response :) –  Mahin Jul 7 '11 at 7:13
    
@Mahin I updated my answer. –  stema Jul 7 '11 at 7:19
    
This address my issue for now, but I didn't go through the entire 80,000 messages so If some messages with no 'bp'value this solution will fail to catch that ward/bed values rite.... Any suggestion to address those odd situation. thanks –  Mahin Jul 7 '11 at 7:26
    
@Mahin I updated my answer again –  stema Jul 7 '11 at 7:32

In the following solution, I don't care of the bp numbers, as you don't want to catch them.

The principle of this solution is to catch a string like '2000/478' or '312YXZ/17' preceded or followed by the word 'patient'.
If the numbering of patient can occur without the word 'patient' before or after it, this solution doesn't work, and you'll have to explain more the cases that may be encountered in the analyzed strings.

import re

ch = '''patient 101/10  bp is 120/90 *some string*
297lol/27 patient
308H/38 patient bp 120/90  
location 415c/45        patient bp120/90 *some string*
*some string* 572/52 patient *this string with no 'bp' value*
a 120/90 bp for 617E/67        patient at 12:32
location 789k/79 bp120/90 *some string*'''

pat = ('(patient[ \t]+)?(\d+[a-zA-Z]*/\d+)(?(1)|[ \t]+patient)')

regx = re.compile(pat)

print [mat.group(2) for mat in regx.finditer(ch)]

result

['101/10', '297lol/27', '308H/38', '415c/45', '572/52', '617E/67']
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