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In my multi threaded web app I invoke in the ThreadPool SomeMethod which can throw an exception. Suppose I want to make a few attempts if it causes an exception at first call. I decide to use System.Timers.Timer inside my action for attempts. Can I use the code below? Is it safely?

static void Caller()
{
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(action =>
        {
            try
            {
                SomeMethod();
                Console.WriteLine("Done.");
            }
            catch
            {
                var t = new System.Timers.Timer(1000);
                t.Start();
                var count = 0;
                t.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler((o, a) =>
                {
                    var timer = o as System.Timers.Timer;
                    count++;
                    var done = false;
                    Exception exception = null;
                    try
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(count);
                        SomeMethod();
                        done = true;
                    }
                    catch (Exception ex)
                    {
                        exception = ex;
                    }
                    if (done || count == 10)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Stopped. done: {0}, count: {1}", done, count));
                        t.Stop();
                        if (!done) throw exception;
                    }
                });
            }
        });
    Thread.Sleep(100000);
}

static void SomeMethod()
{
    var x = 1 / new Random().Next(0, 2);
}
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Consider that System.Timers.Timer is alredy runs on other thread. It's different from System.Windows.Forms.Timer –  Tigran Jul 7 '11 at 8:09
    
@Tigran As I understood my solution is Thread.Sleep. –  johnny Jul 7 '11 at 8:17
    
I tried it and it worked fine. Is there a way a user can also cancel the execution of SomeMethod? –  Nickolodeon Jul 7 '11 at 8:23
    
Brr, there's no point in not using Sleep() here. –  Hans Passant Jul 7 '11 at 8:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should Dispose each Timer after use, that's for sure. But, probably you could do something even simpler:

static void Main()
{
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(action =>
    {
        while (TrySomeMethod() == false)
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
    });

    // wait here
    Console.Read();
}

static bool TrySomeMethod()
{
    try
    {
         SomeMethod();
         return true;
    }
    catch
    {
         return false;
    }
}
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I read that Thread.Sleep() is not good for that task. Isn't it? –  johnny Jul 7 '11 at 8:08
1  
Thread.Sleep is fine on a background thread, although in a more elaborate solution (the one which would support cancelling) I would use a ManualResetEvent, which can be triggered from a different thread. The only problem with Thread.Sleep is that, if you want to signal your background thread to end, you will need to wait before it wakes up. –  Groo Jul 7 '11 at 8:11
    
This code is kind of different from his code, cause his code has a possibility to exit after 10 tries, if it fails for 10 times in sequence. Don't know if it makes a difference for him. –  Tigran Jul 7 '11 at 8:11
    
@Tigran: Oh, it was just an example for the sake of simplicity. I will update it. –  Groo Jul 7 '11 at 8:12
    
Oh, common! Mine was just a remark. Nothing important :) It's up to guy to decide if it makes a difference or not. –  Tigran Jul 7 '11 at 8:13

I do not think that using a timer in a thread pool thread is a safe approach. I may be wrong, but the timer will raise its elapsed event when the thread method has already been finished to execute. In this case, the exception will be thrown. Also, I do not see that you are not disposing the timer which leads to resource leaks. If you explain why you need the timer, I will try to find a safe solution...

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I only need to call SomeMethod several times while it's not executed well or calls count richs allowed number –  johnny Jul 7 '11 at 8:23

I don't see the point of using a Timer within a ThreadPool queue, because the ThreadPool would spawn a new thread, and the Timer would spawn a new thread as well.

I would just have a loop within that delegate, because it would not block the main thread either way. Groo showed a good example of that.

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