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I'm using XSLT 2 (Saxon 9.x) with Java and having the following problem ...

doc-available('file:///C:/Users/filename.xml') 

returns false

However ...

unparsed-text-available('file:///C:/Users/filename.xml') 

returns true

The file is a well-formed XML and exists.

If I use relative paths, then both functions return true. Also tried file:/C:/Users/filename.xml but with the same problem. I have also removed the Windows firewall, but that has no effect.

The same code works in Oxygen.

Any help will be much appreciated.

Thanks, Anupam

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Do you run Saxon 9 from the command line? Then use the -t command line option to see whether that shows more details about loaded/tested files. And which Saxon version do you use, is that different from the one Oxygen uses? –  Martin Honnen Jul 7 '11 at 10:29
    
Any way to find out what the version of Saxon is, from within a stylesheet? I could then run both from within Oxygen and my java app. –  Anupam Bakshi Jul 7 '11 at 14:09
    
Sure, use system-property('xsl:product-version') (e.g. in a value-of or sequence). –  Martin Honnen Jul 7 '11 at 16:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

doc-available() can return false for two reasons: the file doesn't exist, or it can't be parsed as well-formed XML. You've eliminated the first possibility using unparsed-text; that leaves the second. I can't see any reason why a relative URI should work and not an absolute URI. (Well, actually I can, like the relative URI is actually fetching the file from a different location than the absolute URI.)

Essentially there are so many variables affecting the outcome that it's very hard to tell you what the cause is in your particular case.

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It will be very nice to dump the entire environment from within a stylesheet. Perhaps something like "env" on linux. I wonder if thats possible. That way it will be easy to compare. –  Anupam Bakshi Jul 7 '11 at 14:12
    
The "entire environment" is quite big - the whole of the world-wide-web! –  Michael Kay Jul 13 '11 at 21:14

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