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I have been asked in an interview if virtual memory is infinite? I answered saying that it is not infinite. Then the interviewer asked the explanation and what I suggested was that in windows we do have a manual way to configure virtual memory to a certain limit.

I would like to know if Virtual memory is really Infinite?

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up vote 11 down vote accepted

First of all, forget the idea that virtual memory is limited by the size of pointers on your machine.

Virtual memory limits are not the same as addressing space. You can address more virtual memory than is available in your pointer-based address space using paging.

  • Virtual memory upper limits are set by the OS: for example, on 32-bit Windows the limit is 16TB, and on 64-bit Windows the limit is 256TB.
  • Virtual memory is also physically limited by the available disc space.

For an excellent overview, which addresses various misconceptions, see the following:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/06/08/out-of-memory-does-not-refer-to-physical-memory.aspx

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Yes @stusmith i think you are right about You can address more virtual memory than is available in your pointer-based ,and it is whole idea of using virtual memory. –  Amit Singh Tomar Jul 7 '11 at 10:42
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If nothing else then virtual memory is going to be limited by the amount of disk space available, this sadly is far from infinite.

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At the very least, the size of virtual memory is limited by the size of pointers on given platform (unless it has near/far pointers and non-flat memory model). For example, you cannot address more than about 2^32 (4GB) of memory using single 32-bit pointer.

In practice, the virtual memory must be backed up with something eventually -- like a pagefile on disk -- so the size of storage enforces a more practical limit.

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Sorry, that's just wrong. Look up "PAE" (Physical Address Extension) for example. –  stusmith Jul 7 '11 at 10:18
    
@stusmith : A PAE-enabled Linux-kernel requires that the CPU also support PAE. So, it is limited by the computer architecture, right? –  Priyank Bhatnagar Jul 7 '11 at 10:28
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@logic_max: Yes, but a 32-bit Intel chip is capable of supporting PAE. Maybe a better way of putting it is: it is the lowest value of [chip support, OS limit, disk space]. Usually that lowest value is disk space. –  stusmith Jul 7 '11 at 10:30
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Virtual memory is the summation of RAM and available hard disk space in most cases. As the summation is a countable number, it can't be infinity.

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Virtual memory is the summation of RAM and available hard disk space in most cases Wrong. RAM is physical memory, not virtual –  Raoul Jul 7 '11 at 10:09
    
@raoul: i didn't say ram is virtual memory. –  Donotalo Jul 7 '11 at 10:10
    
you clearly said Virtual memory is the summation of RAM and available hard disk space in most cases. –  Raoul Jul 7 '11 at 10:11
    
@raoul: i meant virtual memory = RAM + HDD space in most cases. sorry if my english implies something else. –  Donotalo Jul 7 '11 at 10:12
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I know what you are saying, but it I'm telling you that this is wrong. –  Raoul Jul 7 '11 at 10:14
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You were right to say, no, it's not infinite. Addressable virtual memory is limited by architecture address space. For further info see virtual memory.

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The size of virtual storage is limited by the addressing scheme of the computer system and by the amount of secondary memory available and not by actual number of main memory locations.

For example :- Even if you had 20 TB of secondary memory, it doesn't mean that virtual memory can be 20TB. It is restricted by your computer architecture.

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