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  1. I need to write a function which when given the path of a folder scans the files rooted at that folder.
  2. And then I need to display the directory structure at that folder.

I know how to do 2 (I am going to use jstree to display it in the browser).

Please help me with part 1, like what/where to start to write such a function in go.

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1  
do you need it to go through the directory tree recursively? – newacct Jul 10 '11 at 22:38
up vote 108 down vote accepted

EDIT: Enough people still hit this answer, that I thought I'd update it for the Go1 API. This is a working example of filepath.Walk(). The original is below.

package main

import (
  "path/filepath"
  "os"
  "flag"
  "fmt"
)

func visit(path string, f os.FileInfo, err error) error {
  fmt.Printf("Visited: %s\n", path)
  return nil
} 


func main() {
  flag.Parse()
  root := flag.Arg(0)
  err := filepath.Walk(root, visit)
  fmt.Printf("filepath.Walk() returned %v\n", err)
}

Please note that filepath.Walk walks the directory tree recursively.

This is an example run:

$ mkdir -p dir1/dir2
$ touch dir1/file1 dir1/dir2/file2
$ go run walk.go dir1
Visited: dir1
Visited: dir1/dir2
Visited: dir1/dir2/file2
Visited: dir1/file1
filepath.Walk() returned <nil>

ORIGINAL ANSWER FOLLOWS: The interface for walking file paths has changed as of weekly.2011-09-16, see http://groups.google.com/group/golang-nuts/msg/e304dd9cf196a218. The code below will not work for release versions of GO in the near future.

There's actually a function in the standard lib just for this: filepath.Walk.

package main

import (
    "path/filepath"
    "os"
    "flag"
)

type visitor int

// THIS CODE NO LONGER WORKS, PLEASE SEE ABOVE
func (v visitor) VisitDir(path string, f *os.FileInfo) bool {
    println(path)
    return true
} 

func (v visitor) VisitFile(path string, f *os.FileInfo) {
    println(path)
}

func main() {
    root := flag.Arg(0)
    filepath.Walk(root, visitor(0), nil)
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a way to obtain file information for the files in a directory.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "path/filepath"
)

func main() {
    dirname := "." + string(filepath.Separator)
    d, err := os.Open(dirname)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        os.Exit(1)
    }
    defer d.Close()
    fi, err := d.Readdir(-1)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        os.Exit(1)
    }
    for _, fi := range fi {
        if fi.Mode().IsRegular() {
            fmt.Println(fi.Name(), fi.Size(), "bytes")
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@peterSO : what does Readdir(-1) means? as the Readdir only accept string type, and based on the API documentation, a string can only not be NUL, and no other limitation.. and what is the return type of the "fi" in the Readdir how come it can be walked through (is it a map?) .. – heike Jul 9 '13 at 21:37
    
@heike: See my revised answer, which now includes the API documentation. As you can see, the Readdir method parameter is n an int. If n <= 0, Readdir returns all the FileInfo from the directory in a single slice. – peterSO Jul 10 '13 at 0:12
    
@RickSmith: See package os func (FileMode) IsRegular. – peterSO Jul 10 '13 at 0:14
    
Your code is missing d.Close() I think. – lzap Dec 12 '13 at 10:15
1  
@lzap: Fixed: defer d.Close(). – peterSO Dec 18 '13 at 23:02

Here is an example to loop through all files and directories recursively. Note that if you want to know whether the path you're appending is a directory just check "f.IsDir()".

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "path/filepath"
)

func main() {
    searchDir := "c:/path/to/dir"

    fileList := []string{}
    err := filepath.Walk(searchDir, func(path string, f os.FileInfo, err error) error {
        fileList = append(fileList, path)
        return nil
    })

    for _, file := range fileList {
        fmt.Println(file)
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Did you copy and paste a function? The main method shouldn't have ([]string, error) args and you need to do something with err. Unless at the time of answering it was valid? Definitely a compile error in more recent versions. Otherwise, very useful, thank you. – Steve Feb 6 at 11:34
    
Thanks @Steve that is fixed now. – Francois Feb 7 at 14:16

Package github.com/kr/fs provides a Walker with a very interesting API.

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1  
Much better than the filePath.Walk() imo. Thanks. – nembleton Mar 12 '14 at 11:02

Note that "Walk does not follow symbolic links" so if you are looking to write a function that does that I recomend ioutil.ReadDir. My own benchmark test showed that it is faster and less memory intensive than filepath.Glob.

Additonally, ioutil.ReadDir is sorting files by basename using basic string comparison (strA > strB). As a devops guy, I generally sort dir names by doing a reverse numerical comparison (latest build first for example). If that is also your case then it is better to call os.ReadDir directly (ioutil.ReadDir is calling this under the covers) and do the sorting yourself.

Here is an example of the ReadDir part with Numerical sort:

// ReadDirNumSort - Same as ioutil/ReadDir but uses returns a Numerically
// Sorted file list.
//
// Taken from https://golang.org/src/io/ioutil/ioutil.go
// Copyright 2009 The Go Authors. All rights reserved.
// Use of this source code is governed by a BSD-style
// license that can be found in the LICENSE file.
//
// Modified Sort method to use Numerically sorted names instead.
// It also allows reverse sorting.
func ReadDirNumSort(dirname string, reverse bool) ([]os.FileInfo, error) {
    f, err := os.Open(dirname)
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }
    list, err := f.Readdir(-1)
    f.Close()
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }
    if reverse {
        sort.Sort(sort.Reverse(byName(list)))
    } else {
        sort.Sort(byName(list))
    }
    return list, nil
}

// byName implements sort.Interface.
type byName []os.FileInfo

func (f byName) Len() int      { return len(f) }
func (f byName) Swap(i, j int) { f[i], f[j] = f[j], f[i] }
func (f byName) Less(i, j int) bool {
    nai, err := strconv.Atoi(f[i].Name())
    if err != nil {
        return f[i].Name() < f[j].Name()
    }
    naj, err := strconv.Atoi(f[j].Name())
    if err != nil {
        return f[i].Name() < f[j].Name()
    }
    return nai < naj
}
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