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  1. I need to write a function which when given the path of a folder scans the files rooted at that folder.
  2. And then I need to display the directory structure at that folder.

I know how to do 2 (I am going to use jstree to display it in the browser).

Please help me with part 1, like what/where to start to write such a function in go.

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1  
do you need it to go through the directory tree recursively? –  newacct Jul 10 '11 at 22:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 63 down vote accepted

EDIT: Enough people still hit this answer, that I thought I'd update it for the Go1 API. This is a working example of filepath.Walk(). The original is below.

package main

import (
  "path/filepath"
  "os"
  "flag"
  "fmt"
)

func visit(path string, f os.FileInfo, err error) error {
  fmt.Printf("Visited: %s\n", path)
  return nil
} 


func main() {
  flag.Parse()
  root := flag.Arg(0)
  err := filepath.Walk(root, visit)
  fmt.Printf("filepath.Walk() returned %v\n", err)
}

ORIGINAL ANSWER FOLLOWS: The interface for walking file paths has changed as of weekly.2011-09-16, see http://groups.google.com/group/golang-nuts/msg/e304dd9cf196a218. The code below will not work for release versions of GO in the near future.

There's actually a function in the standard lib just for this: filepath.Walk.

package main

import (
    "path/filepath"
    "os"
    "flag"
)

type visitor int

// THIS CODE NO LONGER WORKS, PLEASE SEE ABOVE
func (v visitor) VisitDir(path string, f *os.FileInfo) bool {
    println(path)
    return true
} 

func (v visitor) VisitFile(path string, f *os.FileInfo) {
    println(path)
}

func main() {
    root := flag.Arg(0)
    filepath.Walk(root, visitor(0), nil)
}
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Here's a way to obtain file information for the files in a directory.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "path/filepath"
)

func main() {
    dirname := "." + string(filepath.Separator)
    d, err := os.Open(dirname)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        os.Exit(1)
    }
    defer d.Close()
    fi, err := d.Readdir(-1)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        os.Exit(1)
    }
    for _, fi := range fi {
        if fi.Mode().IsRegular() {
            fmt.Println(fi.Name(), fi.Size(), "bytes")
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@peterSO : what does Readdir(-1) means? as the Readdir only accept string type, and based on the API documentation, a string can only not be NUL, and no other limitation.. and what is the return type of the "fi" in the Readdir how come it can be walked through (is it a map?) .. –  heike Jul 9 '13 at 21:37
    
@heike: See my revised answer, which now includes the API documentation. As you can see, the Readdir method parameter is n an int. If n <= 0, Readdir returns all the FileInfo from the directory in a single slice. –  peterSO Jul 10 '13 at 0:12
    
@RickSmith: See package os func (FileMode) IsRegular. –  peterSO Jul 10 '13 at 0:14
    
Your code is missing d.Close() I think. –  lzap Dec 12 '13 at 10:15
1  
@lzap: Fixed: defer d.Close(). –  peterSO Dec 18 '13 at 23:02

Package github.com/kr/fs provides a Walker with a very interesting API.

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Much better than the filePath.Walk() imo. Thanks. –  nembleton Mar 12 at 11:02

Here is an example to loop through all files and directories recursively. Note that if you want to know whether the path you're appending is a directory just check "f.IsDir()".

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "path/filepath"
)

func main() ([]string, error) {
    searchDir := "c:/path/to/dir"

    fileList := []string{}
    err := filepath.Walk(searchDir, func(path string, f os.FileInfo, err error) error {
        fileList = append(fileList, path)
        return nil
    })

    for _, file := range fileList {
        fmt.Println(file)
    }
}
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As I've explained in other threads, there is a short flaw here using os.Open(whatever). Let's say if you put a

fmt.Printf("Name a directory which you want to scan for files: \n")
var i string
fmt.Scanf("%s",&i)
d, err := os.Open(i)

And if you input two words or more than two words it will try to open the commands representing those words ( as os.Open states the /usr/bin/ or whatever path commands and uses it as for real ) Therefor, the method of using os.Open to first trying to open the file and then finding its properties is not quite methodical. You should effectively use functions that analyze its properties and filter whatever you need ( if it's a file, a directory, or sorts )

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That does not answer the OP's question, so I am not sure this is an appropriate answer here. –  topskip Oct 4 '13 at 9:14
    
It doesn't indeed, but it is not appropriate to use os.Open(&file) instead of os.Stat to show if it's really a file and to read its properties. I'm just sayin' :) –  BlackNoxis Oct 4 '13 at 22:57

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