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This is my first post here on stackoverflow so I would like to say a big hi! I haved started to explore the android world just some days ago, and I am doing it via the book by Mario Zechner, "Beginning Android Games".

I might have a ton of questions about the platform and the few things I have seen so far but I know it's gonna get better. All I want to ask at the moment is about activities: I saw the activity life cycle. I know that activities are something like screens. The thing I don't know is that whether I have to specify the onCreate(), onResume() etc. methods in every activity I code.

Thank you in advance!

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accept the answer which ever helped you. It would increase your acceptance rate @skypower –  Rosalie Oct 29 '13 at 9:54

6 Answers 6

The entire lifetime of an activity happens between the first call to onCreate(Bundle) through to a single final call to onDestroy(). An activity will do all setup of "global" state in onCreate(), and release all remaining resources in onDestroy(). So onCreate(Bundle) should have be there in activity. Use of onResume() depends upon your application requirement. for more details go to http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/Activity.html

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As far as I know onCreate() is compulsory and the other methods depends on how you use the activity

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Welcome to the world of Android.

In general, it is good practice to flesh out all the methods such as onPause(), onResume() but when you create an android program, generally you only need to flesh out the onCreate() method for activities.

Besides the onCreate, and pardon if my terminology is incorrect, the other methods follow a "default" behavior if you do not override them. So if you need the application to do something specific when it is paused, that would be a good time to add your version of onPause(), otherwise you can leave it left out.

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It is not mandatory that you have to specify all those methods or any of them. It depends on what type of implementation you want

Example I have created my Activity (A) as it extends Activity I donot override any of methods like onCreate() but I have created some variables and created some of methods. Let us assume I created second activity there I want to shoe some view I have used onCreate() method also If I want variables and methods which I have defined in activity A I can get those variables and methods If I write class B extends A

So it is not mandatory to use all those methods from activity. If you donot write your own implementation then the default implementation will come to play.

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Short answer will be NO

You don't need to specify in code of each Activity onCreate and so on. Anyway in parent Activity there will be onCreate

But long answer says: good practice is not rely on implicit/invisible code, but to have code under your control (even if it's dummy). I used to code all onCreate/onDestroy, etc in this way:

public static final boolean DEBUG=true;

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
{
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    if(DEBUG)
        Log.d(TAG, "Creating "+this.toString());
}
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You should write onCreate() method by overriding it from the base class Activity to set the view. View should be generated here itself using setContentView() method in onCreate() method. Regarding onResume(), onPause() and other methods, it is not mandatory to write these but are useful when you need to achieve specific functionality.

Also, being a beginner please have a look at the table 1 in this document, hope this help you to clarify your concepts: http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/fundamentals/activities.html

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