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I have a perl script; on my personal machine, running the exact same version of perl (5.10.1), it runs perfectly fine. However, on the server machine, it not only doesn't run, it gives me odd errors. It ran fine until recently, and I did check that the packages required are installed.

The beginning of the script (where it chokes):

#!/usr/bin/perl
package Hermes;
$VERSION = 3.5;

use FindBin qw($Bin);
push @INC,$Bin;
push @INC ,"/usr/local/lib/perl5/site_perl/5.10.1/";

require("Hermes_config.pm");
$install_Directory = $Config::install_Directory;
push @INC,$install_Directory; #Fix for running from rc.local

use warnings;
#use strict;
use Safe;
use POE;
use POE::Component::IRC;
use Module::Reload;
use Math::Expression::Evaluator;

The output:

Hermes3.0/hermes3.5.pl: 17: package: not found
Hermes3.0/hermes3.5.pl: 18: =: not found
Hermes3.0/hermes3.5.pl: 20: Syntax error: "(" unexpected

(there's 15 lines of commented open-source copyright notice before the program begins, hence the line numbers).

POE, Module::Reload, and Math::Expression::Evaluator are installed (according to instmodsh), cpan tells me FindBin is up to date, reinstalling Safe didn't help, so it doesn't seem to be a missing package - besides which, it's not telling me a package name that's missing, it appears to be choking on the word "package". Reinstalling Perl didn't help (using apt-get install --reinstall perl).

I recently upgraded the machine's version of ubuntu; it's very possible that messed something up, so any hint as to where to start looking would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Btw: You can find out about such errors with perldiag: perldoc.perl.org/perldiag.html. Look for "not found". –  musiKk Jul 7 '11 at 15:00
    
"push @INC" should not be used in top 2 cases, see "lib" pragma. –  Alexandr Ciornii Jul 7 '11 at 20:13
    
Those aren't errors from perl. :) –  brian d foy Jul 7 '11 at 20:38
    
The lib pragma there is a bit tricky because you have to load Hermes_config.pm to get the $Config::install_Directory. You could wrap that in a BEGIN, I guess, but the better way is to use a real configuration file and set the environment so you don't play those games. :) –  brian d foy Jul 7 '11 at 20:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The issue is that bash is trying to run/compile/interpret the script, rather than perl.

#! /usr/bin/perl

should be at the very top of your file, don't have stuff above it.

share|improve this answer
    
...why does it work on the other machine? –  Yamikuronue Jul 7 '11 at 13:35
    
While the script above does appear to have the shebang line I'm inclined to agree with your answer as the likely problem. Perhaps the OP can run the script by explicitly saying 'perl hermes3.5.pl' on the command line to prove/disprove the theory? –  Colin Newell Jul 7 '11 at 13:38
    
Moving the shebang line reveals it now thinks POE is not installed when it quite clearly is, I can see it right there. Which is another issue altogether, and one I'm more familiar with. I'm just waiting until it lets me accept the answer >.> –  Yamikuronue Jul 7 '11 at 13:40
    
Not sure, maybe it's being helpful and realising that it's a Perl script and doing the hard work for you (are you running from the command line or double clicking it in a file browser?). However, the error messages you are seeing are not from the perl compiler so the issue isn't with your perl installation, it's about the data never making it to perl. –  ADW Jul 7 '11 at 13:41
    
I was running from the command line, but I was running another script to launch it as a daemon, whereas locally I was running it using 'perl'. Which probably explains the discrepancy, after a little more research. Thanks. –  Yamikuronue Jul 7 '11 at 13:44

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