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I have a class and an interface, and when I try to instantiate the interface, I get an error:

Cannot create an instance of the abstract class or interface

My code is below:

namespace MyNamespace
{
    public interface IUser
    {
        int Property1 { get; set; }
        string Property2 { get; set; }
        string Property3 { get; set; }
        void GetUser();
    }

    public class User : IUser
    {
        public int Property1 { get; set; }
        public string Property2 { get; set; }
        public string Property3 { get; set; }

        public void GetUser()
        {
           //some logic here...... 
        }

    }
}

When I try to instantiate IUser user = new IUser(); I get an error:

Cannot create an instance of the abstract class or interface

What am I doing wrong here?

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1  
Try to instantiate the User, not the interface. –  Jacob Jul 7 '11 at 13:35

6 Answers 6

The error message seems self-explanatory. You can't instantiate an instance of an interface, and you've declared IUser as an interface. (The same rule applies to abstract classes.) The whole point of an interface is that it doesn't do anything—there is no implementation provided for its methods.

However, you can instantiate an instance of a class that implements that interface (provides an implementation for its methods), which in your case is the User class.

Thus, your code needs to look like this:

IUser user = new User();

This instantiates an instance of the User class (which provides the implementation), and assigns it to an object variable for the interface type (IUser, which provides the interface, the way in which you as the programmer can interact with the object).

Of course, you could also write:

User user = new User();

which creates an instance of the User class and assigns it to an object variable of the same type, but that sort of defeats the purpose of a defining a separate interface in the first place.

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Imagine if one went into a store and asked for a device with a power switch. You didn't say whether you wanted a copier, television, vacuum cleaner, desk lamp, waffle maker, or anything. You asked for a device with a power switch. Would you expect the clerk to offer you something that could only be described as "a device with a power switch"?

A typical interface would be analogous to the description "a device with a power switch". Knowing that a piece of equipment is " a device with a power switch" would allow one to do some operations with it (i.e. turn it on and off), without having to worry about what type of device it was, but in general one would want a "copier", "television", "vacuum cleaner", or other particular type of device.

There are some circumstances where one may want a vaguely-defined object, and really not care about what exactly it is. "Give me your cheapest device that can boil water". It would be nice if one could specify that when someone asks for an arbitrary object with "water boiling" ability, they should be offered an Acme 359 Electric Teakettle, and indeed when using classes it's possible to do that. Note, however, that someone who asks for a "device to boil water" would not be given a "device to boil water", but an "Acme 359 Electric Teakettle".

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You can't instantiate interfaces or abstract classes.

That's because it wouldn't have any logic to it.

Interfaces provide a contract of the methods that should be in a class, without implementation. (So there's no actual logic in the interface).

Abstract classes provide basic logic of a class, but are not fully functional (not everything is implemented). So again, you won't be able to do anything with it.

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IUser is the interface, you can't instantiate the interface.

You need to instantiate the concrete class that implements the interface.

IUser user = new User();

or

User user = new User();
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1  
I think you mean you "can't" instantiate the interface? –  Chris Dunaway Jul 7 '11 at 13:58

You cannot instantiate an abstract class or interface. You must inherit it, if its an abstract class, or implement it if it's an interface. e.g.

...
private class User : IUser
{
  ...
}

User u = new User();
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It is what it says, you just cannot instantiate an abstract class. You need to implement it first, then instantiate that class.

IUser user = new User();
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