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I have a class A that works with List<String>. But nobody outside this class should need to know that it works with strings. However, I also want to supply the concrete implementation the class should use for it's List (via dependency injection).

A should look like this

public class A {
  private ListFactory listFactory; //this gets injected from the outside

  public A(ListFactory listFactory) {
    this.listFactory = listFactory;
  }

  public void a() {
    List<String> = listFactory.createList();
    //...
  }
}

And the caller class B something like this

public class B {
  public void b() {
    ListFactory factory = new ArrayListFactory(); //we want class A to use ArrayList
    A a = new A(factory);
    //...
  }
}

ListFactory would be an interface which is implemented by ArrayListFactory to create ArrayLists.

Quintessence: I don't want that B has to mention String somewhere. And I also don't want that A has to mention ArrayList somewhere.

Is this possible? And how would ListFactory and ArrayListFactory have to look?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is simpler than you're making it, I think:

public interface Factory {
    public <T> List<T> create();
}

public class FactoryImpl implements Factory {
    public <T> ArrayList<T> create() {
        return new ArrayList<T>();
    }
}

...
Factory f = new FactoryImpl();
List<String> strings = f.create();
...
share|improve this answer
    
Wow. Thx! I didn't even knew that syntax. Have to look that up... That's exactly what I wanted –  qollin Jul 7 '11 at 17:48
    
Nice, I missed that as well. –  Victor Sorokin Jul 7 '11 at 17:52

Another attempt thanks to more clear understanding of the issue:

interface ListFactory<T extends List> {
    T create();
}

class ArrayListFactoryImpl implements ListFactory<ArrayList> {
    public ArrayList create() {
        return new ArrayList();
    }
}

class ListWrapper<T> implements List<T> {
    private final List impl;

    public ListWrapper(List impl) {
        this.impl = impl;
    }

    public boolean add(T t) {
        if (!String.class.isAssignableFrom(t.getClass()))
            throw new RuntimeException("Aaaaa");
        return impl.add(t);
    }

    // so on...
}

class A {
    A(ListFactory factory) {
        List<String> stringsOnly = new ListWrapper<String>(factory.create());
    }
}

class Sample {
      public static void main(String[] args) {
          ListFactory<ArrayList> factory = new ArrayListFactoryImpl();
          new A(factory);
      }
}
share|improve this answer

Seems you wrote all you need. Factories will look like:

interface ListFactory<K, T extends List<K>> {
    T create();
}

class ArrayListFactoryImpl implements ListFactory<String, ArrayList<String>> {
    public ArrayList<String> create() {
        return new ArrayList<String>();
    }
}

class Sample {
      public static void main(String[] args) {
          ListFactory<String, ArrayList<String>> factory = new ArrayListFactoryImpl();
          factory.create().add("string");
      }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thx! But that's not quite it, because the ArrayListFactoryImpl is implemented by the "person" who also implements class "B". And that person shouldn't have to know that class "A" needs Strings... Otherwise the user of class A has to know an implementation detail of A (that it uses Strings). –  qollin Jul 7 '11 at 14:34
    
Could you pass factory to B from elsewhere, then? –  Victor Sorokin Jul 7 '11 at 14:46
    
The problem is that the factory currently knows about two things: Strings and ArrayList. And nobody should have to know about both these things, as one is an implementation detail of A and one is an implementation detail of B. But maybe it's not possible... –  qollin Jul 7 '11 at 15:19
    
@qollin then just remove K type param from ListFactory and implementation and return raw ArrayList: generics are compile-time feature so it's impossible for A to enforce list to be <String> at runtime. Other way is to have wrapper over list passed from ListFactory that will check that all arguments to List methods are of String type (or any class passed to wrapper in ctor). –  Victor Sorokin Jul 7 '11 at 15:30

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