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I'm analysing Oracle execution plans and found an astonishing fact. Check out this query. The hint is just to display that I have an index and I'd expect Oracle to use it for range scans:

// execute_at is of type DATE.
PreparedStatement stmt = connection.prepareStatement(
    "SELECT /*+ index(my_table my_index) */ * " + 
    "FROM my_table " +
    "WHERE execute_at > ? AND execute_at < ?");

These two bindings result in entirely different behaviour (to exclude bind variable peeking issues, I actually enforced two hard-parses):

// 1. with timestamps
stmt.setTimestamp(1, start);
stmt.setTimestamp(2, end);

// 2. with dates
stmt.setDate(1, start);
stmt.setDate(2, end);

1) With timestamps, I get an INDEX FULL SCAN and thus a filter predicate

--------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                    | Name                  |
--------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT             |                       |
|*  1 |  FILTER                      |                       |
|   2 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| my_table              |
|*  3 |    INDEX FULL SCAN           | my_index              |
--------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   1 - filter(:1<:2)"
   3 - filter((INTERNAL_FUNCTION(""EXECUTE_AT"")>:1 AND 
               INTERNAL_FUNCTION(""EXECUTE_AT"")<:2))

2) With dates, I get the much better INDEX RANGE SCAN and an access predicate

--------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                    | Name                  |
--------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT             |                       |
|*  1 |  FILTER                      |                       |
|   2 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| my_table              |
|*  3 |    INDEX RANGE SCAN          | my_index              |
--------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   1 - filter(:1<:2)"
   3 - access(""EXECUTE_AT"">:1 AND ""EXECUTE_AT""<:2)

Now my example is just an example. The real query is much more complex, where it is essential to have RANGE SCANS or UNIQUE SCANS (depending on the predicate) rather than FULL SCANS.

Is there something I'm misunderstanding here? Can someone point me to the best solution/practice? Because in the Java world, I think that java.sql.Timestamp is much more suitable but most of our columns are of Oracle's DATE type. We're using Java 6 and Oracle 11g

share|improve this question
    
Note, I found a similar question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1945603/… –  Lukas Eder Jul 8 '11 at 6:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

So the thing is, Oracle timestamps and Oracle dates are two different datatypes. In order to compare a timestamp to a date Oracle has to run a conversion - that INTERNAL_FUNCTION(). The interesting design decision is that Oracle converts the table column rather than the passed value, which means the query no longer uses the index.

I have been able to reproduce your scenario in SQL*Plus, so it's not a problem with using java.sql.Timestamp. Casting the passed timestamps to dates does resolve the problem...

SQL> explain plan for
  2      select * from test1
  3      where d1 > cast(to_timestamp('01-MAY-2011 00:00:00.000', 'DD-MON-YYYY Hh24:MI:SS.FF') as date)
  4       and d2 > cast(to_timestamp('01-JUN-2011 23:59:59.999', 'DD-MON-YYYY Hh24:MI:SS.FF') as date)
  5  /

Explained.

SQL> select * from table(dbms_xplan.display)
  2  /

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
-----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 1531258174

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                   | Name  | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT            |       |    25 |   500 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| TEST1 |    25 |   500 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  2 |   INDEX RANGE SCAN          | T1_I  |     1 |       |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------    
   2 - access("D1">CAST(TO_TIMESTAMP('01-MAY-2011 00:00:00.000','DD-MON-YYYY
              Hh24:MI:SS.FF') AS date) AND "D2">CAST(TO_TIMESTAMP('01-JUN-2011
              23:59:59.999','DD-MON-YYYY Hh24:MI:SS.FF') AS date) AND "D1" IS NOT NULL)
       filter("D2">CAST(TO_TIMESTAMP('01-JUN-2011 23:59:59.999','DD-MON-YYYY
              Hh24:MI:SS.FF') AS date))

18 rows selected.

SQL>

But I don't think that helps you any: it would be easier to just pass dates instead.


Interestingly, building a function-based index casting the date columns to timestamps doesn't help. The INTERNAL_FUNCTION() call isn't recognised as a CAST() and the index is ignored. Trying to build an index using INTERNAL_FUNCTION() hurls an ORA-00904.

share|improve this answer
1  
Casting would be possible, because we use a database abstraction layer for all queries, similar to jooq.org. But I'm afraid that casting might introduce new problems with functional-based indexes. See this question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5340738/…. So yes, probably, considering that we only have DATE columns in the DB, probably we should transform dates"last-minute" from java.sql.Timestamp to java.sql.Date before binding in the database abstraction layer... –  Lukas Eder Jul 8 '11 at 6:17
1  
Using java.sql.Timestamp in Java, but binding java.sql.Date does the trick. The execution plans are now showing index usage... Let's hope this didn't break other stuff... :) –  Lukas Eder Jul 8 '11 at 10:29
1  
Unfortunately, in some cases, Oracle (JDBC, probably) truncates the time part of the java.sql.Date. Especially with INSERT and UPDATE statements, this can be quite wrong... :-/ –  Lukas Eder Jul 26 '11 at 10:11
1  
I guess, casting is the safest here. But I'll check more thoroughly before applying that patch to our database-abstraction... –  Lukas Eder Jul 26 '11 at 12:09

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