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I'm creating a sidenav that has some major links that lead to a list of lesser links. A few of the lesser links are listed after the major links. Should I:

  • format the html like

    <ul id="whatever">
            <li id="child">
            </li>
            <li id="descendent">
            </li>
    </ul>
    

and use a ul id child selector;

  • or format the html like

    <ul>
            <li class="major">
            </li>
            <li class="minor">
            </li>
    </ul>
    

and use a li class selector;

  • or format the html like

    <div class="left nav-major">
    <ul>
            <li>
            </li>
    </div>
    <div class="left nav-minor">
            <li>
            </li>
    </ul>
    </div>
    

and use div selectors;

  • or do something else?

If I should do something else, what should it be? Obviously, I'm trying to optimized load time.

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migrated from superuser.com Jul 7 '11 at 15:15

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1  
I think your last example is garbled. –  slhck Jul 7 '11 at 10:16
    
Okay, slhck. But anyway, I'm also looking at this page: css.maxdesign.com.au/listutorial/sub_master.htm#. They use <ul><li></li><ul><li></li></ul></ul>, and they're using a class descendant tag selector to target the second nested layer and a class tag selector to target the first nested layer. However, I read at developer.mozilla.org/en/Writing_Efficient_CSS to avoid child selectors where possible and always avoid descendant selectors. So, isn't there a more optimal way than the one shown at maxdesign to target nested list items? –  Wolfpack'08 Jul 7 '11 at 10:25
    
I honestly don't know! I was just mentioning because nesting tags like <div><ul></div><div></ul></div> is probably not what you want. –  slhck Jul 7 '11 at 10:28
    
Well, to be really honest, I'm trying to understand this: "Descendant selectors like .content .sidebar are problematic because to determine whether it should apply the styles to .sidebar, it has to find .content. Child selectors (Ex. .content > .sidebar) are better than general descendant selectors because the browser only has to check one other element instead of mutiple elements." –  Wolfpack'08 Jul 7 '11 at 10:41
    
You see, it doesn't make sense to me that child selectors don't have to determine whether the styles should apply to .sidebar and descendant selectors do. It seems like they both have to. In fact, someone told me that child selectors are slower than descendant selectors, sometimes, because descendant selectors use whitespace and child selectors use a character. And of course, maxdesign is so great, and they're using a descendant selector. Weird, right? So what's optimal and how can I figure it out independently in the future? –  Wolfpack'08 Jul 7 '11 at 10:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

CSS doesnt' really affect load time aside from how large your CSS file is.

In your examples, the first and second are exactly the same in terms of the HTML structure.

The 3rd example is not valid markup.

If you want to optimize load time, use the least amount of markup and CSS as you can.

That said, don't go overboard. There's a pragmatic middle-ground as you want to keep the markup semantic and human readable to make it maintainable.

Since a navigation list is typically a list of links, lists seem appropriate:

<ul>
    <li>Main level link
        <ul>
            <li>Child level link</li>
        </ul>
    </li>
</ul>

And there'd be no need for classes, as you could reference the levels in your css as:

.navigation li {style main level links}
.navigation li li {style secondary level links}
share|improve this answer
    
CSS greatly effects load time asside from size, DA. That's why there are so many resources on the net about how to optimize your CSS for different browsers. Check out the links I left in the comments above. They have examples of how huge the difference is. It's literally over a second-long difference targeting the same element with a comparably-long line of text in a different way. –  Wolfpack'08 Jul 8 '11 at 9:16
    
The first and second examples have different CSS, even though the html is the same. :/ –  Wolfpack'08 Jul 8 '11 at 9:16
    
I agree with your CSS, though, for the most part. I'll give you the green check. –  Wolfpack'08 Jul 8 '11 at 9:17
    
@Foshap the first link says nothing about load speed and the second refers to writing XUL code. Neither are applicable. The only variable CSS plays in loading times is the size of the CSS file. As for your first two examples, the differences are HTML attributes. As for optimizing CSS for different browsers, that's rarely related to load time and more related to browser bugs and how to fix them with CSS. –  DA. Jul 8 '11 at 13:45

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