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I have two repositories, and I need to copy whole of one onto the other empty one which has different access levels from the first one. The copy and the mother repository should not be linked together.

I am new to git and it would be awesome if someone could help me with this.

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not sure, but i guess you could just clone it and then use git config remote.origin.url git://new.url/proj.git to set the remote.origin to your new rep. –  Rufinus Jul 7 '11 at 15:38
    
ya the link I just posted does something like that. –  nEm Jul 7 '11 at 15:42
    
@rudinus I did just that. Thanks. –  cowboybebop Jul 7 '11 at 16:08
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2 Answers

See https://help.github.com/articles/duplicating-a-repository

Short version:

In order to make an exact duplicate, you need to perform both a bare-clone and a mirror-push:

mkdir foo; cd foo 
# move to a scratch dir

git clone --bare https://github.com/exampleuser/old-repository.git
# Make a bare clone of the repository

cd old-repository.git
git push --mirror https://github.com/exampleuser/new-repository.git
# Mirror-push to the new repository

cd ..
rm -rf old-repository.git  
# Remove our temporary local repository

NOTE: the above will work fine with any remote git repo, the instructions are not specific to github

The above creates a new remote copy of the repo. Then clone it down to your working machine.

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What happens if the old and new Repositories had the same name (not the same git URL). As in I just clones Jeremy.git into another Jeremy.git –  gran_profaci Apr 19 at 2:55
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I'm assuming you want a full copy, all branches and tags? Check out the last section of this guide: http://help.github.com/move-a-repo/

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