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Currently I have HashMap implemented which

private static Map<String, Item> cached = new HashMap<String, Item>();

and Item is a object with properties Date expirationTime , and byte[] data

This map is used when multiple threads concurrently start hitting this. The check I do is

1.

public static final byte[] getCachedData(HttpServletRequest request) throws ServletException
{
    String url = getFullURL(request);
    Map<String, Item> cache = getCache(request);  // this chec
    Item item = null;

    synchronized (cache)
    {
        item = cache.get(url);
        if (null == item)
            return null;

        // Make sure that it is not over an hour old.
        if (item.expirationTime.getTime() < System.currentTimeMillis())
        {
            cache.remove(url);
            item = null;
        }
    }

    if (null == item)
    {
        log.info("Expiring Item: " + url);
        return null;
    }

    return item.data;
}

2. If data is returned null, then we create and data and cache it in hashMap

public static void cacheDataX(HttpServletRequest request, byte[] data, Integer minutes) throws ServletException
{
    Item item = new Item(data);
    String url = getFullURL(request);
    Map<String, Item> cache = getCache(request);

    log.info("Caching Item: " + url + " - Bytes: " + data.length);
    synchronized (cache)
    {
        Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
        cal.add(Calendar.MINUTE, minutes);
        item.expirationTime = cal.getTime();
        cache.put(url, item);
    }
}

Seems like if multiple threads access the say key (url in this case) , then data gets added to cache more than once at same key location [ as getCacheData will return null for multiple threads since hashmap has not finished writing data for first thread ]

Any suggestions as how to solve the issue ?

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Look at java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap; the method putIfAbsent could be very useful. –  toto2 Jul 7 '11 at 16:27
    
Calender is a very heavy weight object. If you look at the source for GregorianCalender you will see why. Try using System.currentTimeMillis() instead. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 7 '11 at 17:59
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2 Answers

In cacheDataX add a check for the existence of the item before you add (inside of the synchronized block).

synchronized (cache)
    {
        if (cache.get(url) == null) {
            Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
            cal.add(Calendar.MINUTE, minutes);
            item.expirationTime = cal.getTime();
            cache.put(url, item);
        }
    }

This will ensure that multiple threads that have already done a lookup and returned null cannot all add the same data to the cache. One will add it and others threads will silently ignore since the cache has already been updated.

share|improve this answer
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You need one synchronize block, to cover both getting something from the cache plus inserting into the cache. As the code stands you have a race condition: multiple threads can execute step 1 before anybody executes step 2.

share|improve this answer
    
@jtoberon - This has nothing to do with double-check-locking. That is a very specific idiom dealing with object construction and lazy initialization. –  Robin Jul 7 '11 at 18:28
    
I'll remove my previous comment because it was confusing. What I meant was that generally you must do the following within one synchronized block if you want exactly one thing to be created: "(1) check reference, (2) if null, create, (3) set reference." Neither double checking nor the posted code do this properly. –  jtoberon Jul 7 '11 at 18:44
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