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How come when I have Layout = null; in my view - it still pulls in the default layout?!

Is there some trick to stop it doing that?

Here is my view without layout:

@{
    Layout = "";
}

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
<head>
    <title>Index</title>
    @{Html.RenderAction("Head", "Header");}
</head>
<body>
    <div>
        Home
    </div>
</body>
</html>

Here is the rendered output!!

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
<head>
    <title>Index</title>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8" />
    <title></title>
    <link href="/Content/Site.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
    <script src="/Scripts/jquery-1.5.1.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script src="/Scripts/modernizr-1.7.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
</head>

<body>
    header
</body>
</html>
</head>
<body>
    <div>
        Home
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
Please show us your code. – SLaks Jul 7 '11 at 16:09
    
Do you see the word null in the rendered page? – SLaks Jul 7 '11 at 16:09
    
@slaks - nope see above – iwayneo Jul 7 '11 at 16:12
    
Where are you setting the default layout? – SLaks Jul 7 '11 at 16:19
    
Do you have a _viewstart.cshtml in this directory? I had the same problem you're having when I tried using _viewstart. Then I renamed it _mydefaultview, moved it to the views/shared directory, and switched to specifying no view in cshtml files where I don't want it, and specifying _mydefaultview for the rest. Don't know why this was necessary, but it worked. – AFinkelstein Jul 7 '11 at 16:19
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Do you have a _viewstart.cshtml in this directory? I had the same problem you're having when I tried using _viewstart. Then I renamed it _mydefaultview, moved it to the views/shared directory, and switched to specifying no view in cshtml files where I don't want it, and specifying _mydefaultview for the rest. Don't know why this was necessary, but it worked.

share|improve this answer
    
That sounds weird. The _ViewStart should run before the code in the view, so this issue shouldn't happen. Do you have anything unusual in your _ViewStart? – SLaks Jul 7 '11 at 16:59
    
@SLaks♦ I made a _viewstart that just contains "Hello World" to test, and the Hello World still shows up even if I specify Layout = null. However, if I specify _mydefaultview as the layout then that shows up too. The "hello world" is showing up inbetween tags where I have @RenderBody() in _mydefaultview. – AFinkelstein Jul 7 '11 at 17:45
1  
You're misuderstanding _ViewStart. See my answer. – SLaks Jul 7 '11 at 17:52

I think this :

@{
    Layout = "";
 }

is not the same as this :

@{
    Layout = null;
 }

I use the second and it's working, no _Viewstart included.

share|improve this answer

You (and KMulligan) are misunderstanding _ViewStart pages.

_ViewStart will always execute, before your page starts.
It is intended to be used to initialize properties (such as Layout); it generally should not contain markup. (Since there is no way to override it).

The correct pattern is to make a separate layout page which calls RenderBody, and set the Layout property to point to this page in _ViewStart.

You can then change Layout in your content pages, and the changes will take effect.

share|improve this answer

I think it's better work with individual "views", Im trying to move from PHP to MVC4, its really hard but im on the right way...

Answering your question, if you'll work individual pages, just edit the _ViewStart.cshtml

@{ Layout = null; }

Another tip if you're getting some issues with CSS path...

Put "../" before of the url

This are the 2 problems that i get today, and I resolve in that way!

Regards;

share|improve this answer

Logic for determining if a View should use a layout or not should NOT be in the _viewStart nor the View. Setting a default in _viewStart is fine, but adding any layout logic in the view/viewstart prevents that view from being used anywhere else (with or without layout).

Your Controller Action should:

return PartialView()

By putting this type of logic in the View you breaking the Single responsibility principle rule in M (data), V (visual), C (logic).

share|improve this answer
    
This is contrary to what Scott Gu says here weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/asp-net-mvc-3-layouts . we could write code within our _ViewStart.cshtml file to programmatically set the Layout property for each View ... we could vary the Layout template that we use depending on what type of device is accessing the site – and have a phone or tablet optimized layout for those devices He's clearly promoting _viewstart as a place to use logic to switch layouts (also mentions controllers and action filters). So it's more a matter of preference than absolutes re: where to switch layouts. – rism May 12 '15 at 2:18
    
My preference is to stick to designs patterns. You may throw database access in your view, it's also bad practice or "a matter of preference". – Erik Philips May 12 '15 at 15:10
    
That's a fairly hyperbolic response as is the statement "adding any layout logic in the view/viewstart prevents that view from being used anywhere else ". It depends entirely upon the application in question. There are countless examples in which a given view has no dependency on it's layout (master) file. The master is simply there for some branding or nav and all we might want to do is switch between a mobile and desktop layout of that (fluid layouts aside). One could even argue that you actually break SRP by making a controller also responsible for switching layouts in this context . – rism May 12 '15 at 23:54
    
I don't see your point of view on your last statement. The view is presentation of data. Any logic in that view means it cannot be used else where and prevents testing of that logic which would normally happen in the controller. The controller has logic already built into MVC (IsAjaxRequest or ChildActionOnly) to determine the correct presentation. – Erik Philips May 13 '15 at 1:20
    
That presentation may or may not (JSON/XML) not even be Html rendered by a View Engine, so why place logic that determines what needs to be displayed in multiple places (controller, viewstart, and view) when a the controller (the only place that can determine all the types of presentations) can unify the logic and create more maintainable and testable code. – Erik Philips May 13 '15 at 1:24

Just create the view as a partial view so that no layout file is used.

share|improve this answer
    
sadly somehow that does not work in MVC5 – mcy Dec 12 '15 at 12:04

I wanted to display the login page without the layout and this works pretty good for me.(this is the _ViewStart.cshtml file) You need to set the ViewBag.Title in the Controller.

@{
    if (! (ViewContext.ViewBag.Title == "Login"))
    {
        Layout = "~/Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml";        
    } 
}

I know it's a little bit late but I hope this helps some body.

share|improve this answer

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