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I have an ItemsControl which has a move up, move down, and delete button in each item (via template). My ItemsControl source binds to a collection of Items which are model DataContracts/POCOs (not VMs).

I've attached a Caliburn message handler in my main page's view model.

<Button cal:Message.Attach="MoveUp($dataContext)" >Up</Button>
<Button cal:Message.Attach="MoveDown($dataContext)" >Down</Button>

I believe I had to be explicit with cal:Message.Attach and not rely on convention because I was within my ItemTemplate.

View Model:

    ObservableCollection<Item> MyCollection = new ObservableCollection<Item>();  
    //Item class is simple -- only has a string Name property 

    public bool CanMoveUp(Item item)
    {
        var index = MyCollection.IndexOf(item);
        return index > 0;
    }

    public void MoveUp(Item item)
    {
        var index = MyCollection.IndexOf(item);
        if (index > 0)
        {
            MyCollection.Remove(item);
            MyCollection.Insert(index - 1, item);
        }
    }           


    public bool CanMoveDown(Item item)
    {
        var index = MyCollection.IndexOf(item);
        return index > -1 && index < class1.Count - 1;
    }

    public void MoveDown(Item item)
    {
        var index = MyCollection.IndexOf(item);
        if (index > -1 && index < class1.Count - 1)
        {
            MyCollection.Remove(item);
            MyCollection.Insert(index + 1, item);
        }
    }

The first item's up button is initially disabled. When I move down the first item, the 2nd item becomes the first item, but its up button is not automatically disabled. How do I force reevaluation of the CanMoveUp guard method?

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a note on the explicit Attach, with an inline ItemTemplate yes you do need to be explicit, if you define your template in a separate "view" control the binding engine will be able to determine the template and thus you get the standard conventions applied... –  Simon Fox Jul 7 '11 at 23:44

2 Answers 2

In your MoveUp and MoveDown methods, you can notify the UI that the bindings for CanMoveUp/Down have been invalidated using NotifyOfPropertyChanged(() => this.CanMoveUp); (or this.CanMoveDown as appropriate).

This is assuming your ViewModel derives from Screen, Conductor, or PropertyChangedBase which it should.

Update

What you'll want to do is refactor the code to bind the SelectedItem of the ListBox to a property on your view model of type Item. In fact, Caliburn.Micro will do this for you, if your ListBox has an x:Name="Items" for example, it will look for a property called SelectedItem (there are other conventions too that it searches for). Then, your CanMoveUp/Down methods can be properties instead that check the SelectedItem property, and therefore you can use NotifyOfPropertyChanged() to invalidate those bindings.

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Thanks, but NotifyOfPropertyChanged(() => this.CanMoveUp); will not compile since my guards are methods with parameters, not properties. I've also tried NotifyOfPropertyChanged(() => this.CanMoveUp(i)); but Caliburn throws an exception at runtime. –  foson Jul 8 '11 at 13:40
    
Sorry, you're quite right, it was late when I wrote that. I've updated my answer. –  devdigital Jul 8 '11 at 14:03
    
ItemsControl doesn't have SelectedItem -- starting trying this with ListBox. I thought this solution could be a little brittle -- that we are relying on that the ListBoxItem will be selected before the button click will be handled by the ViewModel. I also don't think a singular parameterless CanMoveUp method can work -- when the 2nd item is moved up to the 1st position, I need CanMoveUp to be reevaluated for both the 1st and 2nd items, one returning true, the other returning false. If we are just working off of SelectedItem, this will not happen. Now trying a new VM per row. –  foson Jul 18 '11 at 13:26
    
You're right, ListBox it is. I'm not sure what you mean by your other points. If there is no SelectedItem, then the move up/move down can be made unavailable. i.e. in the SelectedItem setter, NotifyOfPropertyChange on the CanMoveUp/Down, and they can check this.SelectedItem == null and return false. As for reevalution on 1st and 2nd items, again not sure what you mean. When MoveUp/Down is called, you can Notify on CanMoveUp/Down, they will move the item, and then check if the currently selected item (this.SelectedItem) is first/last in the collection. –  devdigital Jul 18 '11 at 13:42

I ended up promoting my Item class to a full fledged ViewModel. I used IoC / MEF so that the Item class could find its container, so it could tell if it was the first or last item in the container. If I need to force reevaluation, I created a method that reevaluates guard properties:

public void ReevaluateButtons()
{
    NotifyOfPropertyChange(() => CanMoveDown);
    NotifyOfPropertyChange(() => CanMoveUp);
}

Still don't know if there is yet a way to force reevaluation of guard methods

NotifyOfPropertyChange(() => CanMoveDown(item));
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