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I currently have a partial-application function which looks like this:

Function.prototype.curry = function()
{
    var args = [];
    for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; ++i)
        args.push(arguments[i]);

    return function()
    {
        for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; ++i)
            args.push(arguments[i]);

        this.apply(window, args);
    }.bind(this);
}

The problem is that it only works for non-member functions, for instance:


function foo(x, y)
{
    alert(x + y);
}

var bar = foo.curry(1);
bar(2); // alerts "3"

How can I rephrase the curry function to be applied to member functions, as in:

function Foo()
{
    this.z = 0;

    this.out = function(x, y)
    {
        alert(x + y + this.z);
    }
}

var bar = new Foo;
bar.z = 3;
var foobar = bar.out.curry(1);
foobar(2); // should alert 6;
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of your curry function just use the bind like:

function Foo()
{
    this.z = 0;

    this.out = function(x, y)
    {
        alert(x + y + this.z);
    }
}

var bar = new Foo;
bar.z = 3;
//var foobar = bar.out.curry(1);
var foobar = bar.out.bind(bar, 1);
foobar(2); // should alert 6;
share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow, true, thanks. I feel quite stupid now. – bfops Jul 7 '11 at 18:00

You're close. this.z inside of this.out references the this scoped to the function itself, not the Foo() function. If you want it to reference that, you need to store a variable to capture it.

var Foo = function() {
    this.z = 0;
    var self = this;

    this.out = function(x, y) { 
        alert(x + y + self.z);
    };
};

http://jsfiddle.net/hB8AK/

share|improve this answer
    
pastebin.com/xKhc7imA – bfops Jul 7 '11 at 17:59
1  
Yeah, your pastebin is true, but your example above is not. Changing your Foo structure to the above fixes it, and it was broke before, due to improper scoping of this. .bind, like Prusse is using, is changing the scope of this, and solving your issue, in the same way. – Robert Jul 7 '11 at 18:06

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