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My perl is getting rusty. It only prints "matched=" but $1 is blank!?!

EDIT 1: WHo the h#$! downvoted this? There are no wrong questions. If you dont like it, move on to next one!

$crazy="abcd\r\nallo\nXYZ\n\n\nQQQ";
if ($crazy =~ m/([.\n\r]+)/gsi) {
    print "matched=", $1, "\n";
} else {
    print "not matched!\n";
} 

EDIT 2: This is the code fragment with updated regex, works great!

$crazy="abcd\r\nallo\nXYZ\n\n\nQQQ";
if ($crazy =~ m/([\s\S]+)/gsi) {
    print "matched=", $1, "\n";
} else {
    print "not matched!\n";
} 

EDIT 3: Haha, i see perl police strikes yet again!!!

share|improve this question
1  
What exactly do you want to match? –  Qtax Jul 7 '11 at 18:28
    
ord($1) returns 13, so it's matching the first \r. –  Mike Jul 7 '11 at 18:33
    
everything, the whole string, that's what i expect to be printed –  Saideira Jul 7 '11 at 18:34
    
@Mike but i have the + after the brackets, it should greedly match entire string, no? –  Saideira Jul 7 '11 at 18:36
1  
@Saideira I'm still confused :-) It's unusual to want to match a whole string with a regex... –  Mike Jul 7 '11 at 18:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't know if this is your exact problem, but inside square brackets, '.' is just looking for a period. I didn't see a period in the input, so I wondered which you meant.

Aside from the period, the rest of the character class is looking for consecutive whitespace. And as you didn't use the multiline switch, you've got newlines being counted as whitespace (and any character), but no indication to scan beyond the first record separator. But because of the way that you print it out, it also gives some indication that you meant more than the literal period, as mentioned above.

share|improve this answer
    
my goal is to match every single char (obviously, this is a simplified example). Dot matches every char, except new lines symbol, so i have them together inside brackets. It doesnt matter if i put "m" in front or at the end of reg ex, $1 still is blank –  Saideira Jul 7 '11 at 18:34
    
@Saideira, See my first remark. "Dot matches every char, except new lines symbol" -- except when within a character class (square brackets) –  Axeman Jul 7 '11 at 18:49
    
Yes, in a character class, a dot is just a dot. Your /s has no affect there. –  brian d foy Jul 7 '11 at 20:19

Axeman is correct; your problem is that . in a character class doesn't do what you expect.

By default, . outside a character class (and not backslashed) matches any character but a newline. If you want to include newlines, you specify the /s flag (which you seem to already have) on your regex or put the . in a (?s:...) group:

my $crazy="abcd\r\nallo\nXYZ\n\n\nQQQ";
if ($crazy =~ m/((?s:.+))/) {
    print "matched=", $1, "\n";
} else {
    print "not matched!\n";
} 
share|improve this answer

. in a character class is a literal period, not match anything. What you really want is /(.+)/s. The /g flag says to match multiple times, but you are using the regex in scalar context, so it will only match the first item. The /i flag makes the regex case insensitive, but there are no characters with case in your regex. The \s flag makes . match newlines, and it always matches "\r", so instead of [.\n\r], you can just use ..

However, /(.+)/s will match any string with one or more characters, so you would be better off with

my $crazy="abcd\r\nallo\nXYZ\n\n\nQQQ";

if (length $crazy) {
    print "matched=$crazy\n";
} else {
    print "not matched!\n";
}

It is possible you meant to do something like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $crazy = "abcd\r\nallo\nXYZ\n\n\nQQQ";

while ($crazy =~ /(.+)[\r\n]+/g) {
    print "matched=$1\n";
}

But that would probably be better phrased:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $crazy = "abcd\r\nallo\nXYZ\n\n\nQQQ";

for my $part (split /[\r\n]+/, $crazy) {
    print "matched=$part\n";
}
share|improve this answer

$1 contains white space, that's why you don't see it in a print like that, just add something after it/quote it.

Example:

perl -E "qq'abcd\r\nallo\nXYZ\n\n\nQQQ'=~/([.\n\r]+)/gsi;say 'got(',length($1),qq') >$1<';"
got(2) >
<

Updated for your comments:

To match everything you can simply use /(.+)/s

share|improve this answer
    
doesnt work. Using precompiled Perl for msys. Platform bug? –  Saideira Jul 7 '11 at 18:39
    
@Saideira, updated. For my example you probably need Perl 5.12 or newer, because I use -E and say, you can just replace those with -e and print. –  Qtax Jul 7 '11 at 19:20
    
@Saideria What version of Perl are you using? The code Qtax sent you requires Perl 5.10 or later (the -E flag is new as of 5.10 and turns on optional features like the say function). –  Chas. Owens Jul 7 '11 at 19:23

[.] (dot inside a character class) does not mean "match any character", it just means match the literal . character. So in an input string without any dots,

m/([.\n\r]+)/gsi

will just match strings of \n and \r characters. With the /s modifier, you are already asking the regex engine to include newlines with . (match any character), so you could just write

m/(.+)/gsi
share|improve this answer
    
/i is useless in that regex (there are no upper or lower case characters for it to affect). –  Chas. Owens Jul 7 '11 at 19:19

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