Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In JavaScript, when converting from a float to a string, how can I get just 2 digits after the decimal point? For example, 0.34 instead of 0.3445434.

share|improve this question
4  
Just some nit-picking: do you want to 'chop off' all but the two first digits, or do you want to round to two digits? –  xtofl Mar 19 '09 at 9:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 95 down vote accepted
var result = Math.round(original*100)/100;

The specifics, in case the code isn't self-explanatory.

edit: ...or just use toFixed, as proposed by Tim Büthe. Forgot that one, thanks (and an upvote) for reminder :)

share|improve this answer
1  
In which case he should use Math.floor(). For positive numbers, that is... –  xtofl Mar 19 '09 at 9:44
24  
This answer isn't actually correct. Use toFixed. –  Andrew Hubbs Jan 10 '12 at 2:34
    
It's not correct. –  Alex Nguyen Oct 29 '13 at 10:11

There are functions to round numbers. For example:

var x = 5.0364342423;
print(x.toFixed(2));

will print 5.04.

EDIT: Fiddle

share|improve this answer
4  
I would recommend against using print() in a browser though –  cobbal Mar 19 '09 at 9:45
    
right, good point, but nobody said this would run in a browser :) –  Tim Büthe Mar 24 '09 at 13:27
2  
works only in iE –  Berov Dec 21 '11 at 14:17
1  
@Berov: that's not true, see my fiddle. –  Tim Büthe Dec 21 '11 at 20:53
22  
Be careful about this, toFixed() returns a string: var x = 5.036432346; var y = x.toFixed(2) + 100; y will be equal "5.03100" –  Vlad Oct 4 '12 at 4:16

Be careful when using toFixed():

First, rounding the number is done using the binary representation of the number, which might lead to unexpected behaviour. For example

(0.595).toFixed(2) === '0.59'

instead of '0.6'.

Second, there's an IE bug with toFixed(). In IE (at least up to version 7, didn't check IE8), the following holds true:

(0.9).toFixed(0) === '0'

It might be a good idea to follow kkyy's suggestion or to use a custom toFixed() function, eg

function toFixed(value, precision) {
    var power = Math.pow(10, precision || 0);
    return String(Math.round(value * power) / power);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 This is the most thorough and predictable solution! –  Jagd Aug 20 '09 at 19:56
    
Yes, this can be very important when creating code to predict prices. Thanks! +1 –  Bomboca Oct 7 '10 at 15:39
9  
I would suggest adding the native .toFixed() method in the return value, which will add the required amount of precision, eg: return (Math.round(value * power) / power).toFixed(precision); and also return the value as a string. Otherwise, precision of 20 is ignored for smaller decimals –  Joss Crowcroft Aug 22 '11 at 17:33
1  
One note regarding toFixed: note that increasing the precision can yield unexpected results: (1.2).toFixed(16) === "1.2000000000000000", while (1.2).toFixed(17) === "1.19999999999999996" (in Firefox/Chrome; in IE8 the latter doesn't hold due to lower precision that IE8 can offer internally). –  jakub.g May 13 '13 at 8:54
    
This doesn't seem to work in Chrome, Safari, or Node. toFixed(1.5, 2) yields "1.5". –  Matt Jan 14 at 5:38
var x = 0.3445434
x = Math.round (x*100) / 100 // this will make nice rounding
share|improve this answer

There is a problem with all those solutions floating around using multipliers. Both kkyy and Christoph's solutions are wrong unfortunately.

Please test your code for number 551.175 with 2 decimal places - it will round to 551.17 while it should be 551.18 ! But if you test for ex. 451.175 it will be ok - 451.18. So it's difficult to spot this error at a first glance.

The problem is with multiplying: try 551.175 * 100 = 55117.49999999999 (ups!)

So my idea is to treat it with toFixed() before using Math.round();

function roundFix(number, precision)
{
    var multi = Math.pow(10, precision);
    return Math.round( (number * multi).toFixed(precision + 1) ) / multi;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's the problem with arithmetic in js: (551.175 * 10 * 10) !== (551.175 * 100). You have to use decimal increments to move the comma for non real decimal results. –  Kir Kanos Mar 31 at 15:55

Maybe you'll also want decimal separator? Here is a function I just made:

function formatFloat(num,casasDec,sepDecimal,sepMilhar) {
    if (num < 0)
    {
        num = -num;
        sinal = -1;
    } else
        sinal = 1;
    var resposta = "";
    var part = "";
    if (num != Math.floor(num)) // decimal values present
    {
        part = Math.round((num-Math.floor(num))*Math.pow(10,casasDec)).toString(); // transforms decimal part into integer (rounded)
        while (part.length < casasDec)
            part = '0'+part;
        if (casasDec > 0)
        {
            resposta = sepDecimal+part;
            num = Math.floor(num);
        } else
            num = Math.round(num);
    } // end of decimal part
    while (num > 0) // integer part
    {
        part = (num - Math.floor(num/1000)*1000).toString(); // part = three less significant digits
        num = Math.floor(num/1000);
        if (num > 0)
            while (part.length < 3) // 123.023.123  if sepMilhar = '.'
                part = '0'+part; // 023
        resposta = part+resposta;
        if (num > 0)
            resposta = sepMilhar+resposta;
    }
    if (sinal < 0)
        resposta = '-'+resposta;
    return resposta;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.