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I have a web application and I am using Oracle database and I have a method basically like this:

public static void saveSomethingImportantToDataBase(Object theObjectIwantToSave) {
      if (!methodThatChecksThatObjectAlreadyExists) {
         storemyObject() //pseudo code
     }
     // Have to do a lot other saving stuff, because it either saves everything or nothing
     commit() // pseudo code to actually commit all my changes to the database.
}

Right now there is no synchronization of any kind so n threads can of course access this method freely, the problem arises when 2 threads enter this method both check and of course there is nothing just yet, and then they can both commit the transaction, creating a duplicate object.

I do not want to solve this with a unique key identifier in my Database, because I don't think I should be catching that SQLException.

I also cannot check right before the commit, because there are several checks not only 1, which would take a considerable amount of time.

My experience with locks and threads is limited, but my idea is basically to lock this code on the object that it is receiving. I don't know if for example say I receive an Integer Object, and I lock on my Integer with value 1, would that only prevent threads with another Integer with value 1 from entering, and all the other threads with value != 1 can enter freely?, is this how it works?.

Also if this is how it works, how is the lock object compared? how is it determined that they are in fact the same object?. A good article on this would also be appreciated.

How would you solve this?.

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1  
Why don't you think you should be catching the SQL exception? Oracle has built in features developed for decades by very smart people, exercised daily by tens of thousands of installed users, that solve your problem. Their wheel works fine. You're going to hate yourself for this kind of in memory locking as soon as your app gets big enough it needs to be clustered. –  Affe Jul 7 '11 at 20:01
    
@Affe The app is in fact in a tomcat cluster already, so yes I am worried about thread locking for that reason... I suppose catching the SQL exception would work, I just wanted to see other possibilities, the thing with catching that SQL exception is that I would have to check it is the right ORA number, does that change often if ever? –  Oscar Gomez Jul 7 '11 at 20:05

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your idea is a good one. This is the simple version, but it's unlikely to work:

public static void saveSomethingImportantToDataBase(Object theObjectIwantToSave) {
    synchronized (theObjectIwantToSave) {
        if (!methodThatChecksThatObjectAlreadyExists) {
            storemyObject() //pseudo code
        }
        // Have to do a lot other saving stuff, because it either saves everything or nothing
        commit() // pseudo code to actually commit all my changes to the database.
    }
}

This code uses the object itself as the lock. But it has to be the same object (ie objectInThreadA == objectInThreadB) if it's to work. If two threads are operating on an object that is a copy of each other - ie has the same "id" for example, then you'll need to either synchronize the whole method:

    public static synchronized void saveSomethingImportantToDataBase(Object theObjectIwantToSave) ...

which will of course gratly reduce concurrency (throughput will drop to one thread at a time using the method - to be avoided), or find a way to get the same lock object based the save object, like this approach:

private static final ConcurrentHashMap<Object, Object> LOCKS = new ConcurrentHashMap<Object, Object>();
public static void saveSomethingImportantToDataBase(Object theObjectIwantToSave) {
    synchronized (LOCKS.putIfAbsent(theObjectIwantToSave.getId(), new Object())) {
        ....    
    }
    LOCKS.remove(theObjectIwantToSave.getId()); // Clean up lock object to stop memory leak
}

This last version it the recommended one: It will ensure that two save objects that share the same "id" are locked with the same lock object - the method ConcurrentHashMap.putIfAbsent() is threadsafe, so "this will work", and it requires only that objectInThreadA.getId().equals(objectInThreadB.getId()) to work properly. Also, the datatype of getId() can be anything, including primitives (eg int) due to java's autoboxing.

If you override equals() and hashcode() for your object, then you could use the object itself instead of object.getId(), and that would be an improvement (Thanks @TheCapn for pointing this out)

This solution will only work with in one JVM. If your servers are clustered, that a whole different ball game and java's locking mechanism will not help you. You'll have to use a clustered locking solution, which is beyond the scope of this answer.

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How does java determine that the object is in fact the same object? –  Oscar Gomez Jul 7 '11 at 19:46
    
@OscarMk - You mean how does Java know that the two threads are referencing the same Object? In that case its identity in memory is enough to know what object it is accessing. For a more general understanding of your issue look up the "Reader/Writer Problem", a popular concurrency issue. –  TheCapn Jul 7 '11 at 19:49
    
@TheCapn Ok I will look into that problem, so it basically determines equality with object 1 == object2 ??, is it possible for it to do a object1.equals(object2) instead?, They will not actually be referencing to the same object in memory, but they have the same attributes. And i want to lock on objects with the same attributes not the same location in memory. –  Oscar Gomez Jul 7 '11 at 19:52
    
@Bohemian That does seem like it would work, but would that be a good solution? –  Oscar Gomez Jul 7 '11 at 19:58
1  
@OscarMk as long as you override .equals() within the Object to do a comparison on the attributes you'll get what you want. –  TheCapn Jul 7 '11 at 20:03

My opinion is you are not struggling with a real threading problem.

You would be better off letting the DBMS automatically assign a non conflicting row id.

If you need to work with existing row ids store them as thread local variables. If there is no need for shared data do not share data between threads.

http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/ThreadLocal.html

An Oracle dbms is much better in keeping the data consistent when an application server or a web container.

"Many database systems automatically generate a unique key field when a row is inserted. Oracle Database provides the same functionality with the help of sequences and triggers. JDBC 3.0 introduces the retrieval of auto-generated keys feature that enables you to retrieve such generated values. In JDBC 3.0, the following interfaces are enhanced to support the retrieval of auto-generated keys feature ...."

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/java.102/b14355/jdbcvers.htm#CHDEGDHJ

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The problem is that nothing is actually inserted till the commit(). –  Oscar Gomez Jul 7 '11 at 21:09
    
I think you should be able to retrieve the keys also before you finally commit the transaction. Just assume pstmt is your prepared statemt and you have already executed it. ResultSet generatedKeys = pstmt.getGeneratedKeys(); –  Joerg Ruethschilling Jul 7 '11 at 21:38
    
I will look into this, but looks good +1 –  Oscar Gomez Jul 7 '11 at 21:59
public static void saveSomethingImportantToDataBase(Object theObjectIwantToSave) {
  synchronized (theObjectIwantToSave) {

      if (!methodThatChecksThatObjectAlreadyExists) {
         storemyObject() //pseudo code
      }
 // Have to do a lot other saving stuff, because it either saves everything or nothing
      commit() // pseudo code to actually commit all my changes to the database.
  }
}

The synchronized keyword locks the object you want so that no other method could access it.

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I don't think you have any choice but to take one of the solutions that you do not seem to want to do.

In your case, I don't think any type of synchronization on the objectYouWantToSave is going to work since they are based on web requests. Therefore each request (on its own thread) is most likely going to have it's own instance of the object. Even though they might be considered logically equal, that doesn't matter for synchronization.

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synchronized keyword (or another sync operation) is must but is not enough for your problem. You should use a data structure to store which integer values are used. In our example HashSet is used. Do not forget clean too old record from hashset.

private static HashSet <Integer>isUsed= new HashSet <Integer>();

public synchronized static void saveSomethingImportantToDataBase(Object theObjectIwantToSave) {

      if(isUsed.contains(theObjectIwantToSave.your_integer_value) != null) {

      if (!methodThatChecksThatObjectAlreadyExists) {
         storemyObject() //pseudo code
      }
 // Have to do a lot other saving stuff, because it either saves everything or nothing
      commit() // pseudo code to actually commit all my changes to the database.
      isUsed.add(theObjectIwantToSave.your_integer_value);

  }
}
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To answer your question about locking the Integer, the short answer is NO - it won't prevent threads with another Integer instance with the same value from entering. The long answer: depends on how you obtain the Integer - by constructor, by reusing some instances or by valueOf (that uses some caching). Anyway, I wouldn't rely on it.

A working solution that will work is to make the method synchronized:

public static synchronized void saveSomethingImportantToDataBase(Object theObjectIwantToSave) {
    if (!methodThatChecksThatObjectAlreadyExists) {
        storemyObject() //pseudo code
    }
    // Have to do a lot other saving stuff, because it either saves everything or nothing
    commit() // pseudo code to actually commit all my changes to the database.
}

This is probably not the best solution performance-wise, but it is guaranteed to work (note, if you are not in a clustered environment) until you find a better solution.

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