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I came across some code with a line looking like:

fprintf(fd, "%4.8f", ptr->myFlt);

Not working with C++ much these days, I read the doc on printf and its ilk, and learned that in this case 4 is the "width", and 8 is the "precision". Width was defined as the minimum number of spaces occupied by the output, padding with leading blanks if need be.

That being the case, I can't understand what the point of a template like "%4.8f" would be, since the 8 (zero-padded if necessary) decimals after the point would already ensure that the width of 4 was met and exceeded. So, I wrote a little program, in Visual C++:

// Formatting width test

#include "stdafx.h"

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    printf("Need width when decimals are smaller: >%4.1f<\n", 3.4567);
    printf("Seems unnecessary when decimals are greater: >%4.8f<\n", 3.4567);
    printf("Doesn't matter if argument has no decimal places: >%4.8f<\n", (float)3);

    return 0;
}

which gives the following output:

Need width when decimals are smaller: > 3.5<
Seems unnecessary when decimals are greater: >3.45670000<
Doesn't matter if argument has no decimal places: >3.00000000<

In the first case, the precision is less than width specified, and in fact a leading space is added. When the precision is greater, however, the width seems redundant.

Is there a reason for a format like that?

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2  
No, there's no reason. If I need something like that I use %0.8f to make it obvious that I don't care how many digits are to the left of the decimal point. –  Mark Ransom Jul 7 '11 at 20:54
1  
I'll bet the original programmer intended the format to specify output formatted like so: 1234.87654321. If I were inventing printf() that's how I might have done it (and come up with some other characters to handle overall width and precision for non-floating point formats). –  Michael Burr Jul 7 '11 at 21:36
    
Why did you tag this c++ rather than c? –  leftaroundabout Jul 7 '11 at 22:15
    
Good point. C is now added. –  Buggieboy Jul 13 '11 at 15:31
    
If you're writing in C++, and you're compiling it with a C++ compiler, then it is C++. The fact that C just might happen to also use printf is utterly irrelevant. –  Puppy Jul 13 '11 at 15:34
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The width format specifier only affects the output if the total width of the printed number is less than the specified width. Obviously, this can never happen when the precision is set greater than or equal to the width. So, the width specification is useless in this case.

Here's an article from MSDN; the last sentence explains it.

A nonexistent or small field width does not cause the truncation of a field; if the result of a conversion is wider than the field width, the field expands to contain the conversion result.

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Perhaps a mistake of the programmer? Perhaps they swapped %8.4f or they actually intended %12.8f or even %012.8f

See codepad sample:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    printf("Seems unnecessary when decimals are greater: >%4.8f<\n", 3.4567);
    printf("Seems unnecessary when decimals are greater: >%8.4f<\n", 3.4567);
    printf("Seems unnecessary when decimals are greater: >%12.4f<\n", 3.4567);
    printf("Seems unnecessary when decimals are greater: >%012.4f<\n", 3.4567);

    return 0;
}

Output

Seems unnecessary when decimals are greater: >3.45670000<
Seems unnecessary when decimals are greater: >  3.4567<
Seems unnecessary when decimals are greater: >      3.4567<
Seems unnecessary when decimals are greater: >0000003.4567<
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Probably just a guess, but: The precision gives the decimals one length that wont be exceeded if you got more decimals. Likewise the width prevents your number from consuming less space than it should. If you think of some kind of table with numbers you only can achieve uniform columns when each column on each row has the same width regardless of the number it contains.

So precision would be needed in some price like format like 10.00€ where you always want 2 decimals.

For your specific line: I feel like you about the redundancy of the width specifier in this special case.

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But the width of 4 applies to the overall output (before and after decimal point). That output can't possibly be narrower than 10, counting decimal point and a number preceding it. Because of the precision of 8, even 0 will be "0.00000000". –  Buggieboy Jul 7 '11 at 20:48
    
As I already stated it does not seem to have any effect in this case. Maybe the format was changed often... –  Nobody Jul 7 '11 at 20:50
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