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I am using jQuery to allow my users to quickly go through their profiles. They have an inbox on their profiles and I am letting them delete past messages using jQuery. The problem is that each time the page is loaded there will be a different number of emails. How can I tell jQuery to manage the function for mail1 and mail2 and mail 3 etc but only if they exists.

Below you will see the jquery I am running for each but there needs to be a loop of some kind.

$(document).ready(function() {
  $("#del1").click(function() {
    $(".mail1").fadeOut();
  });
});

$(document).ready(function() {
  $("#del2").click(function() {
    $(".mail2").fadeOut();
  });
});
share|improve this question
2  
Im not sure what you mean by loop i see nothing to loop on. – Neal Jul 7 '11 at 20:59
    
If the element in question that you're interacting with doesn't exist, jQuery will usually fail silently, so usually there's no need to check first. I also think you need to clarify your question, where do loops come in to this? – Jack Franklin Jul 7 '11 at 21:00
    
It seems @Michael wants to loop over all his del elements and bind a click event to them, when in fact what he should be doing is binding a single click event to all the relevant elements, and then deciding what to hide based on the ID of the element that was clicked. – Acorn Jul 7 '11 at 21:03
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should make your elements and code more generic. For instance, give all delete links the same class, lets say deleteButton and all mails the same class, say mail.

Then use their proximity to deal with them. Maybe something like this:

$(".deleteButton").click(function(){
   $(this).parent().find(".mail").fadeOut();
});

This assumes that the button and the mail share a common parent, but even if they don't, something similar can be done.

share|improve this answer
    
I did it with this one – Michael Jul 8 '11 at 15:26
    
@kingjiv I don't think "this" should be in quotes should it? – kasdega Jul 8 '11 at 16:30
    
@kasdegar nope, it shouldn't. – James Montagne Jul 8 '11 at 17:47

Give each delete button a common class, and a data-id attribute. You can bind the click event to each del button, then delete the corresponding mail element.

$(".del").click(function() {
    var id = $(this).attr("data-id");
    $(".mail" + id).fadeOut();
});
share|improve this answer
2  
That's the same as $(".mail").fadeOut() why loop? Plus he only wants to hide the mail items relating to the clicked delete button. – James Montagne Jul 7 '11 at 21:02
    
I dont think this deserved a downvote. It's pretty much correct except without a nice descriptive explanation. – Perception Jul 7 '11 at 21:03
    
The loop described I think is he thinks he should loop and have #del1, #del2, etc. in a loop until one of them doesn't exist. Just a bad idea. – James Montagne Jul 7 '11 at 21:04
    
This isn't what the user should be doing. – Acorn Jul 7 '11 at 21:05
    
See the edit. I think this solves the problem of looping over delete buttons and deleting the corresponding mail element, instead of looping over each mail element. – Kyle Trauberman Jul 7 '11 at 21:06

I'd try something like this:

$("[id^='del']").each(function(){
 $(this).click(function(){
  $('.mail'+(/\d+/).exec($(this).attr("id"))).fadeOut();
 });
});
share|improve this answer
  1. Bind a click event to all of the del elements.

  2. When they are clicked, get the ID and use it to get the name of the relevant class to be hidden.

  3. Use that class name to do the fadeOut()

share|improve this answer

I think something like this should work:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $("[id^=del]").each(function(){
    var e=$(this),m = e.attr('id').match(/^del(\d+)$/);
    if( m ){
      e.click(function(){$('#.mail'+m[1]).fadeOut();});
    }
  });
});
share|improve this answer
$(document).ready(function() {
    if($("#del1").length){
      $("#del1").click(function() {
        $(".mail1").fadeOut();
      });
    }
    if($("#del2").length){
      $("#del2").click(function() {
        $(".mail2").fadeOut();
      });
    }
    ....
});
share|improve this answer
    
just the if($("*")){ and the ... will do it? – Michael Jul 7 '11 at 21:00
    
@Michael, u need .length – Neal Jul 7 '11 at 21:00
    
I don't think there are a fixed number of #del elements. I think he's saying they are dynamically created and he doesn't know how many he has. – James Montagne Jul 7 '11 at 21:06

Jquery allows you to select with 'startswith' you could also use jquery's regex selector but I think this gets you close:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('*[id^="del"]').click(function() {
    $(this).closest('[class^="mail"]').fadeOut();
  });
});

This assumes that class="mail..." is an ancestor at some point of id="del..."

Since we don't know your exact HTML I like closest instead of parent since parent assumes that del is one layer directly inside of mail.

share|improve this answer
2  
As far as I can tell this would hide all mail elements when any del elements are clicked. The OP wants to hide the corresponding mail element. – Acorn Jul 7 '11 at 21:13
    
Yes you are correct. Edited/corrected to put the fadeOut into context – kasdega Jul 7 '11 at 21:20
    
this in that context is the delete button, the mail is not contained within the delete button so find won't find anything. – James Montagne Jul 7 '11 at 22:38
    
Well you're right in one respect, I can't assume that the mail is in the context of the "del" element. But in the same respect you can't assume that it isn't. I guess I'm pointing out that the question doesn't specify the html involved. We don't even know if it is a button. – kasdega Jul 7 '11 at 23:18
    
as I was writing a example to make my case I realized that it's unlikely that "mail" would be a child of "del" and more than likely that its the other way around. I've edited my answer to reflect that assumption. – kasdega Jul 7 '11 at 23:25

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