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I just saw this and think it's cool.

console.log("Starting...");
$("#my_element")
  .fadeIn()
  .delay(3000)
  .fadeOut();
console.log("Finishing...");

How does the .delay method work under-the-hood? I mean, how does it figure out how to wait 3 seconds but not interrupt the main control flow?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

jQuery has an internal "queue" object, that is just an array:

[ nextAction,
  action,
  action,
  lastAction ]

When you use delay, it pushes:

function delay( ms ){
   setTimeout( dequeue, ms )
}

Meaning that once it gets to the delay, there's a timeout and then the next action is fired. Actions that happen immediately, like .css, however, do:

function css(){
    // do stuff
    dequeue();
}

no delay.

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It is basically using timeouts with your time that you put into the delay function.

See the source code here: http://james.padolsey.com/jquery/#v=1.6.2&fn=delay

The code for queue and dequeue are also useful:
http://james.padolsey.com/jquery/#v=1.6.2&fn=queue
http://james.padolsey.com/jquery/#v=1.6.2&fn=jQuery.dequeue

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