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Let's use a quite plain example with employees and company(-ies).

public abstract class Employee
{
    // bunch of its features
}

public sealed class SalesManager : Employee
{
}

public sealed class SEO : Employee
{
}

Employee can take different posts or play different roles. So using inheritance (maybe with factory patterns in addition) doesn't give such a flexibility for concrete employee instance to change its role.

What would you advice, unfortunately I haven't seen the kind of approaches yet. And I haven't met a book which lights up the problem.

Edit

Thank you guys! In my edit I wanted to ask one more thing. Using generic role is it possible to transfer such a BLL to DAL. I have heard that generics are not supported in Entity Framework??

Thanks!

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2  
Don't fully understand -- do you mean you want employee instances to be polymorphic, able to become a different Type of employee at the instance-level? –  Sean Thoman Jul 7 '11 at 21:45
1  
As you have learned, inheritance is a poor choice to model Roles because an instance type is fixed upon creation. To the no resources part of your question this is a commonly encountered scenario. I usually try to attempt a design myself first, but among others you could consider Fowler's approach: martinfowler.com/apsupp/accountability.pdf –  Sisyphus Jul 8 '11 at 5:30
    
@Sisyphus Thanks! Great advice and article! –  lexeme Jul 9 '11 at 10:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use a has-a relationship

public class Employee 
{
    public Role EmployeeRole { get; set; }
}

public enum Role 
{
    SalesManager,
    SalesPerson
}

Or you can make Role a class to store additional information in addition to the name of their role.

public class Role
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public decimal BaseSalary { get; set; }
}

To illustrate @Aasmund Eldhuset's comment:

public abstract class Role
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public decimal BaseSalary { get; set; }

    public abstract void PerformRole();
}

public class SalesPerson : Role
{
    public void PerformRole()
    {
        // Do something
    }
}
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2  
+1. Role could also be an abstract class (with subclasses) such that you can build behaviour into the roles. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Jul 7 '11 at 21:46
    
@Aasmund can't get the need? Where it is useful, please do illustrate? –  lexeme Jul 7 '11 at 21:51
    
@Kyle it is cool (your edit) and simple, using the approach salary is bound to role object, not employee! Thanks! –  lexeme Jul 7 '11 at 21:54
    
@helicera: Say that you have some complicated business rules about e.g. salaries. Then, the Employee method for calculating salary could have a big if/else that checks what kind of role the employee is in and performs decisions based on that. However, a somewhat prettier solution is to have an abstract method in Role that is overloaded in each subclass to performs the appropriate computation. Then, Employee can simply call this method without any if/else. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Jul 7 '11 at 21:56
    
@Kyle @Aasmund Ok I get it, the trick there is in the PerformRole method. It behaves like salary calculator. –  lexeme Jul 7 '11 at 21:58

Running with the idea of using a class, you can make it generic:

abstract class EmployeeRole { } 

or

interface EmployeeRole { }

And have different types inherit from this abstraction:

class CEO : EmployeeRole { }

class SalesMgr : EmployeeRole { }

class Employee<T> where T : EmployeeRole
{

}

Then have a generic Factory implementation:

public Employee<T> MakeEmployee<T>() where T : EmployeeRole
{

}
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