Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a better way to write the following in my where clause?

WHERE (IIf([GrpOrder]=3,IIf([LabelText]="Totals",True,False),True)) =True))

Thanks,

Scott

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I assume your code contains typos (unblanaced parentheses) and should in fact read:

WHERE IIf([GrpOrder]=3,IIf([LabelText]="Totals",True,False),True) = true

From a SQL code perspective there are actually nine cases to consider because of SQL's three value logic with NULL:

GrpOrder = 3
GrpOrder <> 3
GrpOrder IS NULL

LabelText = 'Totals'
LabelText <> 'Totals'
LabelText IS NULL

In combination there are nine cases e.g. test data and results:

OP_result | GrpOrder | LabelText  
----------------------------------
     TRUE |       55 | 'Totals'
     TRUE |       55 | 'Tallies'
     TRUE |       55 | <NULL>
     TRUE |        3 | 'Totals'
    FALSE |        3 | 'Tallies'
    FALSE |        3 | <NULL>
     TRUE |   <NULL> | 'Totals'
     TRUE |   <NULL> | 'Tallies'
     TRUE |   <NULL> | <NULL>

The safest approach would be to write out a series of OR clauses, explcitly handling NULL for both column for each OR clause. However, that is very long winded it would be better to taget those two cases that return FALSE. And this is where most folk (including me!) run into problems with NULL: it's just too counter-intuitive!

For example, it is tempting to write this:

(GrpOrder = 3 AND LabelText IS NULL)
OR
(GrpOrder = 3 AND LabelText <> 'Totals')

then 'flip' its value using NOT:

NOT (
     (GrpOrder = 3 AND LabelText IS NULL)
     OR
     (GrpOrder = 3 AND LabelText <> 'Totals')
    )

However, in doing so NULL sneaks into the resultset:

OP_result | attempt_1 | GrpOrder | LabelText  
---------------------------------------------
     TRUE |      TRUE |       55 | 'Totals'
     TRUE |      TRUE |       55 | 'Tallies'
     TRUE |      TRUE |       55 | <NULL>
     TRUE |      TRUE |        3 | 'Totals'
    FALSE |     FALSE |        3 | 'Tallies'
    FALSE |     FALSE |        3 | <NULL>
     TRUE |      TRUE |   <NULL> | 'Totals'
     TRUE |    <NULL> |   <NULL> | 'Tallies'
     TRUE |    <NULL> |   <NULL> | <NULL>

So we need to explicitly handle more cases than it might appear at first glance.

The simplest predicate I could come up with that gives the desired result in Access:

NOT
(
 (LabelText <> 'Totals' OR LabelText IS NULL)
 AND GrpOrder = 3 
 AND GrpOrder IS NOT NULL
)

[...which is so odd to read I wonder whether the OP's code is yielding the desired result in the first place.]

The main lessons to learn:

  • NULL in SQL should be avoided: it is counter-intuitive even causes bugs even by very experienced SQL coders.
  • Always post your schema (e.g. CREATE TABLE SQL DDL...) and sample data (... e.g. INSERT INTO SQL DML...) with expected results (... or use words and pictures if you must ;) because if your columns are marked as NOT NULL then the answer is very much simpler! :)

@Yanir Kleiman comments:

GrpOrder can't be 3 and NULL at the same time, so checking it is not null in this case is redundant

One could be forgiven for thinking so. But this is Access :) We have excellent specs for SQL products that claim compliance with the SQL Standards. Access claims no such compliance and the documentation the Access Team have provided is of a particularly low quality.

Rather, in Access-land, for something to be true, you have to actually test it!

When I remove the predicate

AND GrpOrder IS NOT NULL

nulls appear in the resultset. While it feels like this 'defies logic', bear in mind that SQL's three value logic is only defined in a spec to which Access claims no compliance. If the Access Team don't tell us how the product is supposed to work, how can we tell whether the above is a bug or a feature? And even if we could convince them it is a bug, would they fix it?

Below I provide VBA code to reproduce the issue: just copy+paste into any VBA module, no references need to be set. It creates a new .mdb in the temp folder, then creates the table and test data. Access need not be installed on the machine e.g. use Excel's VBA editor.

The messagebox shows shows the resultset when the above predicate is included and removed respectively. In addition to the two table columns, two calculated columns show with values -1 (TRUE), 0 (FALSE) and NULL and the leftmost one is the OP's:

Sub AccessStrangeLogic()

  On Error Resume Next
  Kill Environ$("temp") & "\DropMe.mdb"
  On Error GoTo 0

  Dim cat
  Set cat = CreateObject("ADOX.Catalog")
  With cat
    .Create _
        "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;" & _
        "Data Source=" & _
        Environ$("temp") & "\DropMe.mdb"
    With .ActiveConnection

      Dim Sql As String
      Sql = _
      "CREATE TABLE GrpOrders" & vbCr & _
      "(" & vbCr & _
      " GrpOrder INTEGER," & vbCr & _
      " LabelText NVARCHAR(10)" & vbCr & _
      ");"
      .Execute Sql

      Sql = _
      "INSERT INTO GrpOrders (GrpOrder, LabelText)" & _
      " VALUES (55, 'Totals');"
      .Execute Sql
      Sql = _
      "INSERT INTO GrpOrders (GrpOrder, LabelText)" & _
      " VALUES (55, 'Tallies');"
      .Execute Sql
      Sql = _
      "INSERT INTO GrpOrders (GrpOrder, LabelText)" & _
      " VALUES (55, NULL);"
      .Execute Sql
      Sql = _
      "INSERT INTO GrpOrders (GrpOrder, LabelText)" & _
      " VALUES (3, 'Totals');"
      .Execute Sql
      Sql = _
      "INSERT INTO GrpOrders (GrpOrder, LabelText)" & _
      " VALUES (3, 'Tallies');"
      .Execute Sql
      Sql = _
      "INSERT INTO GrpOrders (GrpOrder, LabelText)" & _
      " VALUES (3, NULL);"
      .Execute Sql
      Sql = _
      "INSERT INTO GrpOrders (GrpOrder, LabelText)" & _
      " VALUES (NULL, 'Totals');"
      .Execute Sql
      Sql = _
      "INSERT INTO GrpOrders (GrpOrder, LabelText)" & _
      " VALUES (NULL, 'Tallies');"
      .Execute Sql
      Sql = _
      "INSERT INTO GrpOrders (GrpOrder, LabelText)" & _
      " VALUES (NULL, NULL);"
      .Execute Sql

      ' Include "AND GrpOrder IS NOT NULL"
      Sql = _
      "SELECT *, " & vbCr & _
      "       IIf([GrpOrder]=3,IIf([LabelText]=""Totals"",True,False),True) = true AS OP_result, " & vbCr & _
      "       NOT" & vbCr & _
      "       (" & vbCr & _
      "        (LabelText <> 'Totals' OR LabelText IS NULL)" & vbCr & _
      "        AND GrpOrder = 3 " & vbCr & _
      "        AND GrpOrder IS NOT NULL" & vbCr & "       )" & vbCr & _
      "  FROM GrpOrders" & vbCr & _
      " ORDER " & vbCr & _
      "    BY GrpOrder DESC, LabelText DESC;"

      Dim rs
      Set rs = .Execute(Sql)

      ' Remove "AND GrpOrder IS NOT NULL"
      Sql = Replace$(Sql, "AND GrpOrder IS NOT NULL", "")

      Dim rs2
      Set rs2 = .Execute(Sql)

      MsgBox _
          "Include 'AND GrpOrder IS NOT NULL':" & vbCr & _
          rs.GetString(, , vbTab, vbCr, "<NULL>") & vbCr & _
          "remove 'AND GrpOrder IS NOT NULL':" & vbCr & _
          rs2.GetString(, , vbTab, vbCr, "<NULL>")


    End With
    Set .ActiveConnection = Nothing
  End With
End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
Ironically, you missed the fact that using a NOT you already solved the case where GrpOrder = NULL: In this case GrpOrder = 3 will return false, therefore the whole thing will return true - so you can remove "GrpOrder IS NOT NULL" predicate. Another way to look at it: GrpOrder can't be 3 and NULL at the same time, so checking it is not null in this case is redundant. –  Yanir Kleiman Jul 8 '11 at 10:48
    
@Yanir Kleiman: "GrpOrder can't be 3 and NULL at the same time, so checking it is not null in this case is redundant" -- you are wrong and I can prove it :) See the update to this answer. –  onedaywhen Jul 8 '11 at 13:49
    
The "avoid Null" advice is TERRIBLE. Just about the worst thing you've ever written. –  David-W-Fenton Jul 10 '11 at 2:21
1  
Secondly, expecting NULL to behave differently than NULL is designed to behave is the principle reason why people have trouble with it. They expect that they can compare it to known values. That's just pilot error, not a problem with NULL, which logically must behave the way it is defined to behave. –  David-W-Fenton Jul 15 '11 at 18:59
1  
Null better represents real-world data. It's easier to work with than the alternatives, which involve manufacturing fake data. I'm done here. –  David-W-Fenton Jul 22 '11 at 22:06
show 19 more comments

First of all the second IIF is redundant - "IIF(X, True, False)" can always be replaced by "X".

Apart from that, the logic of the select is "where GrpOrder = 3 and LabelText="Totals", OR GrpOrder <> 3".

That is the same as saying "where LabelText="Totals" OR GrpOrder <> 3", hence:

WHERE [GrpOrder] <> 3 OR [LabelText]="Totals"

*I don't remember if access uses <> or != for inequality, so whichever works.


Edit:

We have 4 cases in total:

GrpOrder = 3 and LabelText = "Totals" => accept

GrpOrder = 3 and LabelText <> "Totals" => don't accept

GrpOrder <> 3 and LabelText = "Totals" => accept

GrpOrder <> 3 and LabelText <> "Totals" => accept

The only case we do not accept is when GrpOrder = 3 and LabelText<> "Totals", which is the same as saying we accept all rows where GrpOrder <> 3 (bottom two rows) or LabelText="Totals" (first and third row). Row 2 is the only one that is not accepted.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure that's correct. My interpretation of these nested iif's are that they're trying to say "give me all records, with the following exception. I don't want any records where GrpOrder=3 except where GrpOrder=3 and LabelText="Totals". (I didn't write this, I inherited it) –  Scott Silvi Jul 7 '11 at 23:15
    
Your interpretation is the logical complement of what I wrote. I'll edit the answer to make it clearer. –  Yanir Kleiman Jul 7 '11 at 23:21
    
There's probably some Access quirk I'm unaware of (plus there are imbalanced parens in the question so I can't e sure) but reading this from a SQL code point of view it seems you've missed a case: when GrpOrder = 3 and LabelText IS NULL then the OP's predicate will evaluate to FALSE whereas yours will evaluate to NULL. While it is true that in SQL DML the effect will be the remove the row from the resultset, if this was used in SQL DDL (e.g. a CHECK constraint) or a calculated column then the effect would be to allow the update to succeed when it should fail. –  onedaywhen Jul 8 '11 at 7:59
    
Doh! I missed the obvious case when GrpOrder IS NULL and LabelText IS NULL: in SQL DML (e.g. in the WHERE clause of a regular query) your predicate will remove the row whereas it would be retained by the OP's. –  onedaywhen Jul 8 '11 at 8:20
    
"I don't remember if access uses <> or != for inequality" -- sounds like you didn't test this, hence the two cases you missed I suppose. Access uses <>, BTW. –  onedaywhen Jul 8 '11 at 8:21
show 5 more comments

I don't want any records where GrpOrder=3 except where GrpOrder=3 and LabelText="Totals".

where GrpOrder <> 3 or (GrpOrder = 3 and LabelText="Totals")
share|improve this answer
    
lol I have no idea why I couldn't put 1+1 together here –  Scott Silvi Jul 8 '11 at 0:45
1  
I don't think this properly handles cases when GrpOrder IS NULL. –  onedaywhen Jul 8 '11 at 9:46
    
This is correct, but the GrpOrder = 3 predicate can be removed, since whenever it is false the whole clause will always be true due to GrpOrder <> 3. –  Yanir Kleiman Jul 8 '11 at 10:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.