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I have a whitespace delimited file with a variable number of entries on each line. I want to replace the first two whitespaces with commas to create a comma delimited file with three columns.

Here's my input:

a b  1 2 3 3 2 1
c d  44 55 66 2355
line http://google.com 100 200 300
ef jh  77 88 99
z y 2 3 33

And here's my desired output:

a,b,1 2 3 3 2 1
c,d,44 55 66 2355
line,http://google.com,100 200 300
ef,jh,77 88 99
z,y,2 3 33

I'm trying to use perl regular expressions in a sed command but I can't quite get it to work. First I try capturing a word, followed by a space, then another word, but that only works for lines 1, 2, and 5:

$ cat test | sed -r 's/(\w)\s+(\w)\s+/\1,\2,/'
a,b,1 2 3 3 2 1
c,d,44 55 66 2355
line http://google.com 100 200 300
ef jh  77 88 99
z,y,2 3 33

I also try capturing whitespace, a word, and then more whitespace, but that gives me the same result:

$ cat test | sed -r 's/\s+(\w)\s+/,\1,/'
a,b,1 2 3 3 2 1
c,d,44 55 66 2355
line http://google.com 100 200 300
ef jh  77 88 99
z,y,2 3 33

I also try doing this with the .? wildcard, but that does something funny to line 4.

$ cat test | sed -r 's/\s+(.?)\s+/,\1,/'
a,b,1 2 3 3 2 1
c,d,44 55 66 2355
line http://google.com 100 200 300
ef jh,,77 88 99
z,y,2 3 33

Any help is much appreciated!

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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How about this:

sed -e 's/\s\+/,/' | sed -e 's/\s\+/,/'

It's probably possible with a single sed command, but this is sure an easy way :)

My output:

a,b,1 2 3 3 2 1
c,d,44 55 66 2355
line,http://google.com,100 200 300
ef,jh,77 88 99
z,y,2 3 33
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Thanks, worked like a charm. I was definitely making this too complicated! –  Stephen Turner Jul 8 '11 at 0:36
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Try this:

sed -r 's/\s+(\S+)\s+/,\1,/'

Just replaced \w (one "word" char) with \S+ (one or more non-space chars) in one of your attempts.

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You can provide multiple commands to a single instance of sed by just providing multiple -e arguments.

To do the first two, just use:

sed -e 's/\s\+/,/' -e 's/\s\+/,/'

This basically runs both commands on the line in sequence, the first doing the first block of whitespace, the second doing the next.

The following transcript shows this in action:

pax$ echo 'a b  1 2 3 3 2 1
c d  44 55 66 2355
line http://google.com 100 200 300
ef jh  77 88 99
z y 2 3 33
' | sed -e 's/\s\+/,/' -e 's/\s\+/,/'

a,b,1 2 3 3 2 1
c,d,44 55 66 2355
line,http://google.com,100 200 300
ef,jh,77 88 99
z,y,2 3 33
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Not sure about sed/perl, but here's an (ugly) awk solution. It just prints fields 1-2, separated by commas, then the remaining fields separated by space:

awk '{
  printf("%s,", $1)
  printf("%s,", $2)
  for (i=3; i<=NF; i++)
    printf("%s ", $i)
    printf("\n")
}' myfile.txt
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A Perl solution is:

perl -pe '$_=join ",", split /\s+/, $_, 3' some.file
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Another Perl solution can't hurt, since the question was tagged with both Perl and Sed tags. perl -pe 's/([^\s,]+)\s/$1.(my$c++<3&& ",")." "/eg' I actually like the join/split method shown in the same thread better, but with a little work there is a s///eg alternative. This method keeps track of how many substitutions have been performed and only subs in a comma the first three times for each line. Maybe someday there will be a /g{3} option to constrain a m//g or s///g to three matches. –  DavidO Jul 8 '11 at 1:58
    
At least use auto split if using Perl. ;-) –  Qtax Jul 8 '11 at 2:51
    
Eg: perl -anE 'say "$F[0],$F[1],$F[2] $F[3..$#F]"' –  Qtax Jul 8 '11 at 2:57
    
I suppose it should be perl -anE 'say "$F[0],$F[1],$F[2] @F[3..$#F]"' –  sid_com Jul 8 '11 at 11:13
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Sed s/// supports a way to say which occurrence of a pattern to replace: just add the n to the end of the command to replace only the nth occurrence. So, to replace the first and second occurrences of whitespace, just use it this way:

$ sed 's/  */,/1;s/  */,/2' input
a,b ,1 2 3 3 2 1
c,d ,44 55 66 2355
line,http://google.com 100,200 300
ef,jh ,77 88 99
z,y 2,3 33

EDIT: reading another proposed solutions, I noted that the 1 and 2 after s/ */,/ is not only unnecessary but plainly wrong. By default, s/// just replaces the first occurrence of the pattern. So, if we have two identical s/// in sequence, they will replace the first and the second occurrence. What you need is just

$ sed 's/  */,/;s/  */,/' input 

(Note that you can put two sed commands in one expression if you separate them by a semicolon. Some sed implementations do not accept the semicolon after the s/// command; use a newline to separate the commands, in this case.)

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I think you mean to have /1 both times –  ysth Jul 8 '11 at 1:54
    
You are right. Actually, the /1 is pretty unnecessary anyway. I have updated my question. –  brandizzi Jul 8 '11 at 2:00
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