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Currently my project is composed of various concrete classes. Now as I'm getting into unit testing it looks like I'm supposed to create an interface for each and every class (effectively doubling the number of classes in my project)? I happen to be using Google Mock as a mocking framework. See Google Mock CookBook on Interfaces. While before I might have just classes Car and Engine, now I would have abstract classes (aka C++ interfaces) Car and Engine and then the implementation classes CarImplementation and EngineImpl or whatever. This would allow me to stub out Car's dependency on Engine.

There are two lines of thought I have come across in researching this:

  1. Only use interfaces when you may have the need for more than one implementation of a given abstraction and/or for use in public APIs, so otherwise don't create interfaces unnecessarily.

  2. Unit tests stubs/mocks often are the "other implementation", and so, yes, you should create intefaces.

When unit testing, should I create an interface for each class in my project? (I'm leaning towards creating interfaces for ease of testing)

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3 Answers 3

Think you've got a number of options. As you say, one option is to create interfaces. Say you have classes

class Engine:
{
public:
    void start(){ };
};

class Car
{
public: 
    void start()
    {
        // do car specific stuff
        e_.start();

private:
    Engine e;
};

To introduce interfaces - you would have to change Car to take an Engine

class Car
{
public: 
    Car(Engine* engine) :
    e_(engine)
    {}

    void start()
    {
        // do car specific stuff
        e_->start();

private:
    Engine *e_;
};

If you've only got one type of engine - you've suddenly made your Car objects harder to use (who creates the engines, who owns the engines). Cars have a lot of parts - so this problem will continue to increase.

If you want seperate implementations, another way would be with templates. This removes the need for interfaces.

class Car<type EngineType = Engine>
{
public: 
    void start()
    {
        // do car specific stuff
        e_.start();

private:
    EngineType e;
};

In your mocks, you could then create Cars with specialised engines:

Car<MockEngine> testEngine;

Another, different approach, would be to add methods to Engine to allow it to be tested, something like:

class Engine:
{
public:
    void start();
    bool hasStarted() const;
};

You could then either add a check method to Car, or inherit from Car to test.

class TestCar : public Car
{
public:
    bool hasEngineStarted() { return e_.hasStarted(); }
};

This would require Engine to be changed from private to protected in the Car class.

Depending on the real world situation, will depend on which solution is best. Also, each developer will have their own holy grail of how they believe code should be unit tested. My personal views is to keep the client/customer in mind. Lets assume your clients (perhaps other developers in your team) will be creating Cars and don't care about Engines. I would therefore not want to expose the concepts of Engines (a class internal to my library) just so I can unit test the thing. I would opt for not creating interfaces and testing the two classes together (third option I gave).

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there are two categories of testing regarding implementation visibility: black-box testing and white-box testing

  • black-box testing focuses on testing implementation through their interfaces, and validating the adjust to their spec.

  • white-box testing tests granular details about the implementation that SHOULD NOT in general be accessible from the outside. This sort of testing will validate that the implementation components work as intended. So their results are mostly of interest to developers trying to figure out what is broken, or needs mantainance

mocks by their definition fit into modular architectures, but it doesn't follow that all classes in a project need to be entirely modular out themselves. Its perfectly fine to draw some line when a group of classes will know about each other. They as a group can present to other modules from the persepective of some facade interface class. However, you'll still want to have white-box test drivers inside this module with knowledge about the implementation details. Hence this sort of testing is not a good fit for mocks.

It follows trivially from this that you don't need to have mocks or interfaces for everything. Just take the high-level design components that implement facade interfaces and create mocks for them. It will give you the sweet spot where mock testing pays off IMHO

having said that, try to use the tool to your needs, rather than letting the tool force you into changes you think will not be beneficial in the long run

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Thanks for your answer; I'm trying to grok it. Are you saying whitebox testing is not a good fit for mocks? The way I'm looking at unit testing is I'm trying to test each code unit. So for example, I want to test Car and Car depends on an Engine class. In order to ensure I'm doing a unit test and not an integration test, I need to mock the Engine class (& one way or another get Car to use my mocked Engine). Otherwise I'm testing two classes and doing an integration test, not a unit test. And in order to easily mock the Engine class it seems it needs to be an interface. –  User Jul 12 '11 at 21:36
    
the only difference here is what a unit represents. Usually for some people a unit to be tested represents a compilation unit, or a class, but it doesn't have to be so. For instance, if you create a graph class, node and edge will be highly coupled with each other, so its pretty pointless to test them in isolation. Just wrap the whole graph module in a facade interface and when other modules need to interact with a mock representation of graph, mock the graph facade, not the individual classes (as a proper facade, will need so API level representations of the nodes, like integers or id) –  lurscher Jul 12 '11 at 21:45
    
In my understanding of unit testing, if the edge class uses the node class, then when I'm testing the edge class, I would want to mock the node class because I do not want to test two "units" at the same time. If an edge class test fails I would not know if it was edge or node that truly failed. I think I would call what you're talking about integration testing (realizing it's just semantics to a degree). –  User Jul 13 '11 at 2:07
    
yes, to be honest i think its a matter of taste what you will conceive as a unit and at what resolution you'll stop and say 'here i say, this will be my conceptual unit', in my view, edges and nodes are sintactic elements but without true functionality in themselves; they only adquire their semantics in their mutual interaction. So for me, unit testing needs to test the API of the unit (here, the graph) and verify it matches the expected semantics of it (only meaningful as a whole). Of course you don't want to grow these too much, otherwise you'll end up again in unraveling untangled code –  lurscher Jul 13 '11 at 3:15

Creating interfaces for every class within your project may or may not be necessary. This is entirely a design decision. I've found that it mostly isn't. Often in n-tier design you wish you abstract the layer between data access and logic. I would argue that you should work towards this as it aids in testing the logic without much infrastructure necessary for the tests. Methods of abstraction like dependency injection and IoC would require you to do something like this and would make it easier to test said logic.

I would examine what you are trying to test and focus on the areas that you view as most prone to error. This can help you decide whether interfaces are necessary.

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