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Let's say I create an instance of a class and override one of its methods at the same time - like this

MyClass fred = new MyClass() {
    @Override
    public void mymethod() {
        super.mymethod();
        //call something here
    }
};

Now let's imagine I want to call a local method which has the SAME name and SAME (lack of) parameters as my overridden method - e.g. I have

public void mymethod() {
    //my stuff in here
}

How can I call that from within the overridden method (on the line //call something here)???

Is that even possible? Using

this.mymethod();  

causes an endless loop (the overriden method is simply calling itself)

Is there a way of accessing this method (other than via a static reference perhaps?)

Sorry if this is a common question - it's a hard thing to search for and the one question I found had no replies and wasn't really that well-phrased so I'm trying myself!!

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Could you link to the other relevant question? Perhaps we can answer that one, too... –  Mark Elliot Jul 8 '11 at 1:50
    
I'm not 100% sure it was on StackOverflow - browsing back through my History for here doesn't show it up so I suspect it was on a 'clone' site - if I do chance across it again, I'll link it here tho –  shrewdlogarithm Jul 8 '11 at 1:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't have a complier handy so I'm not 100% sure here, but try this:

ParentClass.this.myMethod();
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+1: neat trick, it works: ideone.com/bc6rJ –  Mark Elliot Jul 8 '11 at 1:59
    
Not a trick, though, part of the definition of addressing enclosing instances. If the actual type of this is T, you can always use T.this as a qualifier when invoking instance methods. –  Nathan Ryan Jul 8 '11 at 2:02
    
Wouldn't that only work if myMethod() were static? –  shrewdlogarithm Jul 8 '11 at 2:03
    
@John Peat: No, JLS §15.8.4 Qualified this applies. –  trashgod Jul 8 '11 at 2:08
2  
Right answer but not well expressed, since the containing class may not be MyClass (it was not specified in the question) - you want ParentClass.this.mymethod() where ParentClass could be MyClass, but probably isn't. –  Charles Goodwin Jul 8 '11 at 2:14

An ugly, but functioning solution:

final MyOtherClass parent = this;

MyClass fred = new MyClass() {
    @Override
    public void mymethod() {
        super.mymethod();
        parent.mymethod();
    }
};

I'm struggling to see the scenario where you need to do this for naming purposes, but it's useful to know that this in the anonymous class will refer to the anonymous class, not the "parent"; so if you find the need to access the parent's method it's a useful technique.

FWIW, here's a working example.

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Ah - that's kinda obvious (I'm feeling a bit of a berk now)! I realise that, ideally, I'd use different names - if for no other reason than to aid readability - but that could be useful - thanks! –  shrewdlogarithm Jul 8 '11 at 1:54
    
@John: right, the exact use-case of this is unclear, but I can imagine a situation where you're stuck with APIs you cannot control. –  Mark Elliot Jul 8 '11 at 1:55

I am not sure if I fully understood the question but my guess is that you want something like this:

public class ParentClass {
    public void mymethod() {
        ....
    }

    public void someOtherMethod() {
        MyClass fred = new MyClass() {
            @Override
            public void mymethod() {
                super.mymethod();
                //call something here
                ParentClass.this.mymethod();
            }
        }
    }
}

Note ParentClass.this.mymethod()

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1  
This is the answer. –  Charles Goodwin Jul 8 '11 at 2:13
    
It sure is but @Paul slightly beat @Charles to the chase - thanks tho! –  shrewdlogarithm Jul 8 '11 at 14:17
    
Actually it's not my answer, it is Alex Gitelman's, and he beat Paul to it but Paul amended his answer. Haha the evolving Internet, it rewrites short term history! –  Charles Goodwin Jul 8 '11 at 18:01
    
@Charles I think actually Paul was first. My observation is that once you try to elaborate the answer you lose time to market and someone beats you :) –  Alex Gitelman Jul 8 '11 at 18:13
    
@Alex Gitelman: true, and I meant that you were the first to post the accurate answer, Paul posted his first but it was initially a bit confused. –  Charles Goodwin Jul 8 '11 at 23:34

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