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there is obviously issues with this code but it causes an access violation only in retail and not in debug. any specific reasons? VS 2008 is the compiler. assume enabled = true

void parse(bool enabled)
{
  char* p = NULL;
  if (enabled)
  {
     char a[100] = 'jsajas';
     p = &a;
  }
  if (p != NULL)
  {
     p[0] = 'a';
  }
}

EDIT: I know the reason why this fails. I wanted to know what is causing it to crash in retail and not in debug. how is the memory handled differently.

EDIT: edited the code slightly to make it more clear what my question is.

EDIT: reverting the old code and adding the new code below as people dont seem to like it. Sorry for causing confusion. My intention is to really understand the issue when allocated in the heap.

void parse(bool enabled)
{
  char* p = NULL;
  if (enabled)
  {
     char* a = new char[100];
     a[0] = 'a';
     p = a;
  }
  if (p != NULL)
  {
     p[0] = 'a';
  }
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by casperOne Aug 22 '12 at 13:50

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3  
Use double quotes for strings. –  Chris Lutz Jul 8 '11 at 2:10
1  
It's called Undefined Behavior. That means it can do anything including crash (or not). –  Loki Astari Jul 8 '11 at 2:15
3  
You changed your code! –  hexa Jul 8 '11 at 2:17
    
Maybe I'm tired, but I don't see anything wrong with your modified code. Assuming I'm not tired, this means you still haven't actually shown us the problem code. My guess: as destructor is being called after you create a reference to its internals. –  Dennis Zickefoose Jul 8 '11 at 2:40
    
ahh you are right –  Sriram Subramanian Jul 8 '11 at 2:43

5 Answers 5

void parse(bool enabled)
{
  char* p = NULL;
  if (enabled)
  {
     char* a = new char[100];
     a[0] = 'a';
     p = a;
  }
  if (p != NULL)
  {
     p[0] = 'a';
  }
}

Your modified piece of codes looks fine. But you did not free the 100 bytes allocated from the heap. And the pointers (both a and p) pointing to the allocated memory is not known outside of this function. It means no one outside of this function can de-allocate too.

Memory leak.

share|improve this answer

Should be char a[100] = "abcd" (note double quotes)

Should be p = a or p = &a[0]

And of course, as soon as a goes out of scope at the first }, the array object is no longer valid. So this is Undefined Behavior, which can easily work fine with one compiler, compiler version, or set of switches and crash with another.

share|improve this answer

Undefined behavior is undefined. It may crash, trash the stack, or just proceed normally. There's no rhyme or reason to it, because it's undefined. It can do different things in different builds; there's no guarantee of anything. Hence the term "undefined".

That's why you should stick with defined behavior.

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Statement should be p = a; an array is already a pointer you're telling p to be a pointer of a pointer which is why you're accessing some odd memory location. On top of this array a is declared inside the a scope, this is undefined, some compilers preallocate this and it will work fine, others declare it only once executing inside the scope of the if statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Compile #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { printf("%zu\n", sizeof(int [100])); return 0; } and then repeat "An array is not a pointer" 10 times before bed every night for the next month. –  Chris Lutz Jul 8 '11 at 2:13
    
In C an array degrades to a pointer easier than in C++. There is a difference but a single dimensional array might as well be a pointer to stack reserved memory. –  Jesus Ramos Jul 8 '11 at 2:15
    
But yes sizeof(array) returns the size in bytes of the allocated block. –  Jesus Ramos Jul 8 '11 at 2:15
    
No, it isn't. There is no pointer until the array degrades to one. &a is not a "pointer to a pointer," it's a "pointer to an array" (specifically it is of type int (*)[100]). –  Chris Lutz Jul 8 '11 at 2:20
    
The problem is he's assigning it to p which degrades it to just a char* which would cause a to degrade to a pointer. Obviously he does &a, which is wrong and instead should have been char *p[]; –  Jesus Ramos Jul 8 '11 at 2:30

You are accessing a variable (the array a) after the flow of control has exited the scope in which it is declared. This is undefined behaviour.

MSVC can generate very different code depending on whether you are using a Release or Debug set of switches. It's possible that:

  • in Debug mode, the compiler allocates enough space on the stack for all variables declared anywhere within the function
  • in Release mode, the compiler generates code that changes the amount of memory allocated on the stack as scopes are entered and exited

In order to find the answer, you can look at the generated assembly code.

share|improve this answer
    
does that change if it is allocated in the heap? I modified the code to reflect that. –  Sriram Subramanian Jul 8 '11 at 2:14
    
Please don't change the question after you have received answers. Now it's just confusing, since all the answers refer to the original question. –  Greg Hewgill Jul 8 '11 at 2:19
2  
Allocating on the heap is a completely different story. Does your code still crash for you in release mode when allocating on the heap? (It shouldn't, because you haven't done anything undefined.) –  Greg Hewgill Jul 8 '11 at 2:19
    
the original code allocates in the heap –  Sriram Subramanian Jul 8 '11 at 2:20
1  
No, your original code allocates on the stack. –  Greg Hewgill Jul 8 '11 at 2:22

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