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The iota template function was added to the standard library to fill an iterator range with an increasing sequence of values.

  template<typename ForwardIterator, typename Tp>
    void
    iota(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last, Tp value)
    {
      for (; first != last; ++first)
        {
          *first = value;
          ++value;
        }
    }

Most other templates in <numeric> have versions that accept user-specified operators. Having this:

  template<typename ForwardIterator, typename Tp, typename Operator>
    void
    iota(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last, Tp value, Operator op)
    {
      for (; first != last; ++first)
        {
          *first = value;
          op(value);
        }
    }

would be convenient if you don't want to (or can't) overload operator++() for Tp. I would find this version more widely usable than the default operator++() version. <

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You're right, with lambdas the second version is not only more flexible than the first, but almost as easy to use for increment. –  Ben Voigt Jul 8 '11 at 2:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With lambdas, the second version doesn't save much, you can just use std::generate.

template<typename ForwardIterator, typename Tp, typename Operator>
void iota(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last, Tp value, Operator op)
{
  std::generate(first, last, [&value,&op](){auto v = value; op(value); return v;});
}

In fact, this makes the existing implementation of std::iota very redundant:

template<typename ForwardIterator, typename Tp>
void iota(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last, Tp value)
{
  std::generate(first, last, [&value](){return value++;});
}
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True, iota probably just blesses the SGI version which is distributed by gcc as an extension and probably other implementations. –  emsr Jul 8 '11 at 2:52
1  
partial_sum is even better (no [&]). vector<int> i(10,0); partial_sum(i.begin(),i.end(),i.begin(),[](int p, int c) {return p++;} –  kirill_igum Jan 25 '13 at 0:37
    
@kirill: Nearly so. But partial_sum doesn't accept a value parameter to seed the accumulation. Also the ++ postincrement in your code snippet is useless... the updated value of p is discarded immediately. In fact, your code snippet is totally wrong, and doesn't create an increasing sequence at all. –  Ben Voigt Jan 25 '13 at 1:09
    
@BenVoigt @kirill_igum thanks, it should be ++p. now it works. you can also modify the lambda function or have [&value]. the main point is that's another way. you can use it if you want something quick and don't want to make another function. –  kirill_igum Jan 25 '13 at 1:46
    
@kirill: It should be p+1. But std::generate works quite well already, and gives the flexibility in starting value that partial_sum doesn't. –  Ben Voigt Jan 25 '13 at 1:56

I suspect the reason is the usual mix of one or more of the following reasons:

  • No one submitted a proposal
  • It wasn't considered important enough for this version (which was already huge, and very late)
  • it fell through the cracks and was forgotten (like copy_if in C++98)
  • it is easy to replace using std::generate.
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