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i have written a java program to reverse the contents of the string and display them.

here is the code..

import java.util.*;
class StringReverse
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.print("Enter a string to be reversed :");
        String input = in.next();  
        char[] myArray = new char[input.length()];
        myArray = input.toCharArray();
        int frontPos=0,rearPos=(myArray.length)-1;
        char tempChar;
        while(frontPos!=rearPos)
        {
            tempChar=myArray[frontPos];
            myArray[frontPos]=myArray[rearPos];
            myArray[rearPos]=tempChar;
            frontPos++;
            rearPos--;
        }
        System.out.println();
        System.out.print("The reversed string is : ");
        for(char c : myArray)
        {
            System.out.print(c);
        }

    }
}

Now the program works fine for strings of length greater than or equal to 5. But if I give a string of length 4 as input, I get an ArrayIndexOutOfBounds Exception. What could be the problem?

share|improve this question
    
Which line does the exception get thrown? –  Mark Elliot Jul 8 '11 at 2:33
    
Nope, that algorithm surely won't work for all strings with length greater or equal 5 (a hint: for 50%) - and will actually work correct for strings smaller than 5. Just think the execution of your algorithm through for a few testcases and you'll certainly see the problem yourself –  Voo Jul 8 '11 at 2:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The issue isn't that the input is of length 4, but that the length 4 is an even length, so your stopping condition never hits. That is, frontpos never equals rearpos for even length strings.

You should instead just make sure that frontpos is less than rearpos, changing while(frontPos!=rearPos) to while(frontPos < rearPos) should clear things up.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 beaten by 6 secs.. –  Ziyao Wei Jul 8 '11 at 2:35
    
Thank you very much, I have changed the while (condition) and worked like a charm.. –  kunaguvarun Jul 8 '11 at 3:42

Would probably be easier to write with only one counter.

for(int i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++) {
  char temp = myArray[i];
  myArray[i] = myArray[myArray.length - i - 1];
  myArray[myArray.length - i - 1] = temp;
}
String reversed = new String(myArray);
share|improve this answer

Why are you making the logic so complicated. It can easily be done as:

char temp[] = new char[str.length()];
    int k = 0;

    for(int i = str.length()-1 ; i >= 0 ; i--)
    {
        temp[k] = str.charAt(i);
        k++;
    }
System.out.println(new String(temp));
share|improve this answer
public String reverse(String str)
{
    String rev = " ";
    for (int i = 0 ; i < str.length(); i++)
    {
        rev = str.charAt(i) + rev;
    }
    return rev.trim();
}

Input:

December

Output:

rebmeceD
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