Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Given, say, 1.25 - how do I get "1" and ."25" parts of this number?

I need to check if the decimal part is .0, .25, .5, or .75.

share|improve this question
    
Will a simple explode work? $splitDec = explode(".", $decimal); $splitDec[0] will now by the 1 and splitDec[1] will now be 25 from your example. – Matt Jul 8 '11 at 2:35
    
@Matt split() has been deprecated. – alex Jul 8 '11 at 2:36
    
@alex yea, forgot. Was thinking javascript. changed to explode. – Matt Jul 8 '11 at 2:37
    
@Matt, split has been deprecated as of PHP 5.3 and actually takes a regex as its arg, whereas explode takes a string. explode() is preferred in this case. – shelhamer Jul 8 '11 at 2:37
1  
Be aware that explode(".",1.10); wil give 1 and 1, not 1 and 10 – Michel Oct 8 '13 at 10:29

10 Answers 10

up vote 70 down vote accepted
$n = 1.25;
$whole = floor($n);      // 1
$fraction = $n - $whole; // .25

Then compare against 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, etc.


In cases of negative numbers, use this:

function NumberBreakdown($number, $returnUnsigned = false)
{
  $negative = 1;
  if ($number < 0)
  {
    $negative = -1;
    $number *= -1;
  }

  if ($returnUnsigned){
    return array(
      floor($number),
      ($number - floor($number))
    );
  }

  return array(
    floor($number) * $negative,
    ($number - floor($number)) * $negative
  );
}

DEMO

The $returnUnsigned stops it from making -1.25 in to -1 & -0.25

share|improve this answer
1  
As a side, intval() or simple casting as (int) might be more performant than floor() – Jason McCreary Jul 8 '11 at 2:36
    
How does floor account for negatives? – LanceH Jul 8 '11 at 15:08
    
@LanceH: It doesn't, but you can make it handle it pretty easily with a negative flag. – Brad Christie Jul 8 '11 at 15:09
    
This answer is actually inaccurate unless you add a round(). Sounds dumb, I know, but it has to do with low-level floating point number arithmetic. See here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3726721/php-math-precision – Matt James Sep 12 '14 at 18:56

This code will split it up for you:

list($whole, $decimal) = explode('.', $your_number);

where $whole is the whole number and $decimal will have the digits after the decimal point.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 beat me. Note the OP my not be dealing with money. – Jason McCreary Jul 8 '11 at 2:34
    
You're right, I removed the reference to money. – shelhamer Jul 8 '11 at 2:36
    
+1 This solution avoids rounding errors – clapas Oct 17 '12 at 10:56
3  
Be aware that explode(".",1.10); wil give 1 and 1, not 1 and 10 – Michel Oct 8 '13 at 10:29
2  
This breaks and throws warning about undefined index, if number is integer or does not contain decimal part. – Andreyco Nov 16 '13 at 16:42

Just to be different :)

list($whole, $decimal) = sscanf(1.5, '%d.%d');

CodePad.

As an added benefit, it will only split where both sides consist of digits.

share|improve this answer
1  
This one does not break if number does not contain decimal part. Great! – Andreyco Nov 16 '13 at 16:41
    
Nice that this outputs two integers; rather than an int and a float. – foochow Dec 12 '13 at 21:31
    
This assumes that the number is not going to end up being represented in scientific notation when cast to string. If it's a really really huge or really really tiny number then this won't be the case and this method will break. – GordonM Oct 4 '15 at 9:42

There's a fmod function too, that can be used : fmod($my_var, 1) will return the same result, but sometime with a small round error.

share|improve this answer

The floor() method doesn't work for negative numbers. This works every time:

$num = 5.7;
$whole = (int) $num;  // 5
$frac  = $num - (int) $num;  // .7

...also works for negatives (same code, different number):

$num = -5.7;
$whole = (int) $num;  // -5
$frac  = $num - (int) $num;  // -.7
share|improve this answer

Cast it as an int and subtract

$integer = (int)$your_number;
$decimal = $whole - $integer;

Or just to get the decimal for comparison

$decimal = $your_number - (int)$your_number
share|improve this answer

a short way (use floor and fmod)

$var = "1.25";
$whole = floor($var);     // 1
$decimal = fmod($var, 1); //0.25

then compare $decimal to 0, .25, .5, or .75

share|improve this answer

This is the way which I use:

$float = 4.3;    

$dec = ltrim(($float - floor($float)),"0."); // result .3
share|improve this answer

Brad Christie's method is essentially correct but it can be written more concisely.

function extractFraction ($value) 
{
    $fraction   = $value - floor ($value);
    if ($value < 0)
    {
        $fraction *= -1;
    }

    return $fraction;
}

This is equivalent to his method but shorter and hopefully easier to understand as a result.

share|improve this answer
val = -3.1234

fraction = abs(val - as.integer(val) ) 
share|improve this answer
2  
Hi, do add a bit of explanation along with the code as it helps to understand your code. Code only answers are frowned upon. – Bhargav Rao Jan 10 at 17:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.