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Data file - data.txt:

ABC "I am ABC" 35 DESC
DEF "I am not ABC" 42 DESC

cat data.txt | awk '{print $2}'

will result the "I" instead of the string being quoted

How to make awk so that it ignore the space within the quote and think that it is one single token?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, this can be done nicely in awk. It's easy to get all the fields without any serious hacks.

(This example works in both The One True Awk and in gawk.)

{
  split($0, a, "\"")
  $2 = a[2]
  $3 = $(NF - 1)
  $4 = $NF
  print "and the fields are ", $1, "+", $2, "+", $3, "+", $4
}
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To format for a one liner: cat data.txt | awk 'split($0, a, "\"") {$2 = a[2]} {$3 = $(NF - 1)} {$4 = $NF} {print "and the fields are ", $1, "+", $2, "+", $3, "+", $4}' –  Chris Gregg Jul 8 '11 at 4:21
3  
This only works if you have a single quoted field, on the second position, and have 4 fields in total. It's not generic. A solution where it will accept any quoted field in any position will be ideal. –  Joaquin Cuenca Abela Jan 19 at 12:55

Try this:

$ cat data.txt | awk -F\" '{print $2}'
I am ABC
I am not ABC
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I should note that this isn't particularly generic -- it simply changes the field separator to `" and selects the second field. –  Chris Gregg Jul 8 '11 at 3:27
    
But if I want to use the information before and after... it won't work =( –  Roy Chan Jul 8 '11 at 3:35
    
@Roy Chan -- true. Awk is not really the right tool for parsing quoted strings. Go down to the third post at this horribly formatted Google Cache link and you can see an example that is much longer but might help. –  Chris Gregg Jul 8 '11 at 3:39
1  
It's not so hard. –  DigitalRoss Jul 8 '11 at 4:04
1  
@DigitalRoss -- nice solution; I hadn't thought of that method. –  Chris Gregg Jul 8 '11 at 4:08

I've scrunched up together a function that re-splits $0 into an array called B. Spaces between double quotes are not acting as field separators. Works with any number of fields, a mix of quoted and unquoted ones. Here goes:

#!/usr/bin/gawk -f

# Resplit $0 into array B. Spaces between double quotes are not separators.
# Single quotes not handled. No escaping of double quotes.
function resplit(       a, l, i, j, b, k, BNF) # all are local variables
{
  l=split($0, a, "\"")
  BNF=0
  delete B
  for (i=1;i<=l;++i)
  {
    if (i % 2)
    {
      k=split(a[i], b)
      for (j=1;j<=k;++j)
        B[++BNF] = b[j]
    }
    else
    {
      B[++BNF] = "\""a[i]"\""
    }
  }
}

{
  resplit()

  for (i=1;i<=length(B);++i)
    print i ": " B[i]
}

Hope it helps.

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Okay, if you really want all three fields, you can get them, but it takes a lot of piping:

$ cat data.txt | awk -F\" '{print $1 "," $2 "," $3}' | awk -F' ,' '{print $1 "," $2}' | awk -F', ' '{print $1 "," $2}' | awk -F, '{print $1 "," $2 "," $3}'
ABC,I am ABC,35
DEF,I am not ABC,42

By the last pipe you've got all three fields to do whatever you'd like with.

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Actually, there are 4 fields. –  DigitalRoss Jul 8 '11 at 4:04
    
Oops -- I missed that in the original submission. –  Chris Gregg Jul 8 '11 at 4:09

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