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I have the below input

Data
-----
A,10
A,20
A,30
B,23
B,45

Expected output

col1  Col2
----  -----
A      10
A      20
A      30
B      23
B      45

How can I do so.... I am new to T-SQL programming ... please help

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted
SELECT substring(data, 1, CHARINDEX(',',data)-1) col1,
substring(data, CHARINDEX(',',data)+1, LEN(data)) col2
FROM table
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@nikrts sorry i posted my answer which is almost identical to you but i didnt copy your. –  rahularyansharma Jul 8 '11 at 4:08
    
You tried to help someone right? No problem!!! –  niktrs Jul 8 '11 at 4:10
    
@nikrts thanks buddy. –  rahularyansharma Jul 8 '11 at 4:13
    
Nothing wrong with this solution, Wouldn't it be more appropiate to use 'left, 'right + reverse' with new logic instead of 'substring' ? –  t-clausen.dk Jul 8 '11 at 10:43
declare @string nvarchar(50)
set @string='AA,12'

select substring(@string,1,(charindex(',',@string)-1) ) as col1 
, substring(@string,(charindex(',',@string)+1),len(@string) ) as col2![my sql server image which i tried.][1]
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I know the points has already been given, going to post it anyway because i think it is slightly better

DECLARE @t TABLE (DATA VARCHAR(20))

INSERT @t VALUES ('A,10');INSERT @t VALUES ('AB,101');INSERT @t VALUES ('ABC,1011')

SELECT LEFT(DATA, CHARINDEX(',',data) - 1) col1, 
RIGHT(DATA, LEN(DATA) - CHARINDEX(',', data)) col2
FROM @t
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if the values in column 1 are always one character long, and the values in column 2 are always 2, you can use the SQL Left and SQL Right functions:

SELECT LEFT(data, 1) col1, RIGHT(data, 2) col2
FROM <table_name>
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